Accessibility

What is the Accessibility for Manitobans Act?

February 15, 2018 • Written by

The AMA

Following Ontario’s lead, Manitoba became the second Canadian jurisdiction to pass accessibility legislation for people with disabilities when the Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) came into law in December 2013. The AMA attempts to ensure people of all abilities have opportunities to full and effective participation in everyday life.

Accessible Standards

The AMA has five standards that provide requirements to address how to identify, remove and prevent barriers in each domain.

The AMA standards:

  • Customer Service
  • Employment
  • Information and Communication
  • Built Environment
  • Transportation

The Customer Service Standard came into effect on November 1, 2015. The deadline for public sector organizations, like Red River College, to comply with the requirements outlined in the standard was November 1, 2017. The standard addresses training, communication, and respectful, barrier-free customer service.

The guides supporting the standard are written in plain language for better understanding of your role in removing barriers and provide ways you can ensure a accessible service.

Customer Service Standard guides:

  • Employers’ Handbook on Accessible Customer Service (PDF) (Word)
  • Tips for Employees on Accessible Customer Service (PDF) (Word)
  • Consumer Guide on Accessible Customer Service (PDF) (Word)

Proposed recommendations for the Employment Standard were recently submitted to the Minister of Families following public consultations and a public review.

Recommendations for the Information and Communication Standard are currently in development. This standard addresses the authoring, design, delivery and procurement of information and communications products, services, systems and environments.

 

Web Accessibility Guidelines

February 15, 2018 • Written by

Web Accessibility Initiative

The World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) was created to  develop guidelines for ensuring web accessibility. These guidelines include the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG).

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are guidelines developed to ensure accessible web and digital content. WCAG is for anyone who is involved in the production of web and digital content, including writers, designers, and developers.

WCAG 2.0

WCAG 2.0 is the current set of guidelines for creating web content. WCAG 2.0 guidelines were developed in 2008 and became an international standard (ISO) in 2012.

WCAG 2.0 applies to web and digital content, including:

  • Web content: Layout, structure, images, navigation, links, tables, instructions, colour, colour contrast, written text
  • Forms: Form elements, buttons, input fields
  • Documents: Word, PDF, Excel
  • Presentations: PowerPoint
  • Time-based media: video, audio, animation, interactives
  • Apps: Content, navigation, usability
  • Social Media
  • Email

WCAG Overview – an introduction to WCAG, supporting technical documents, and educational material

Understanding WCAG 2.0 – A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

WCAG 2.1

WCAG 2.1 is built on and extends WCAG 2.0. It is currently in review and expected to be released in spring 2018.

Understanding WCAG 2.1 – A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1

Silver

Silver is the successor to WCAG. It is currently in early development.

Learn more about Silver

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) are guidelines for developing accessible authoring tools. ATAG 2.0 is the current set of guidelines.

What is in ATAG

  • Making authoring tools accessible for people with disabilities so they can create web content
  • Help authors create more accessible web content

Who ATAG is for:

Developers of:

  • web content authoring tools (HTML editors), learning management systems (LMS), content management systems (CMS), courseware tools, multimedia authoring tools, blogs, wikis, word processors, etc.

Policy makers, managers and others who:

  • Want accessible authoring tools and authoring tools that can produce accessible content
  • Can encourage their existing vendors to improve accessibility in future versions to their authoring tools

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

February 15, 2018 • Written by

WCAG 2.0

WCAG 2.0 is the current set of guidelines for creating web content. WCAG 2.0 guidelines were developed in 2008 and became an international standard (ISO) in 2012.

WCAG 2.0 applies to web and digital content, including:

  • Web content: Layout, structure, images, navigation, links, tables, instructions, colour, colour contrast, written text
  • Forms: Form elements, buttons, input fields
  • Documents: Word, PDF, Excel
  • Presentations: PowerPoint
  • Time-based media: video, audio, animation, interactives
  • Apps: Content, navigation, usability
  • Social Media
  • Email

Who WCAG is for

WCAG is for anyone who is involved in the production of web and digital content, including writers, designers, and developers.

WCAG Structure

WCAG 2.0 has four principles with 12 guidelines. For each guideline, there are testable success criteria. These success criteria are rated at three levels: A, AA, and AAA.

WCAG struture: Principle, Guideline and Success Criteria

Principles

WCAG 2.0 has four principles:

  • Perceivable
  • Operable
  • Understandable
  • Robust

Perceivable

Illustrations of an eye, ear and hand

Can your audience see, hear and touch your content?

Perceivable has four guidelines:

  • Text Alternatives for non-text content: controls, time based media (audio, video, animation), CAPTCHA alternatives, images, tests and excercises
  • Time-based Media: audio and video, captioning, sign language, media alternatives
  • Adaptable: structure, sequence and presentation of content, content can be rendered in another format
  • Distinguishable: Colour, audio control, contrast, font size, audio, and imeges of text

Operable

An illustration of a speaker, keyboard and a hand pinching

Can your audience operate the interface?

Operable has four guidelines:

  • Keyboard accessible: all functionality can be achieved using only a keyboard (input and control)
  • Enough time: time to complete tasks, adjustable timing, pausing
  • Seizures: avoids three flash threshold that is likely to cause seizure
  • Navigable: able to navigate content and destinations (i.e. links), provide multiple ways to go to a destination

Understandable

An illustration of a head with an arrow pointing to the brain

Can your audience understand your content? Can they use the user interface?

Understandable has three guidelines:

  • Readable: define language of page, limit text column width, avoid centre aligned and justified text, use media (images, illustrations, audio and video) to clarify content, use clearly written content
  • Predictable: present content in a uniform order and provide consistent navigation
  • Input Assistance: reduce errors and support input by helping users understand how to correct an error

Robust

Illustration of a mobile device, laptop and document

Can your audience access your content on their device? Using their assistive technologies?

Robust has one guideline:

  • Compatible: support compatibility with future user agents (software such as browsers and media players) and assistive technologies (AT), avoid deprecated technologies

Resources

WCAG Overview – an introduction to WCAG, supporting technical documents, and educational material

Understanding WCAG 2.0 – A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

Web and Digital Accessibility Resources

February 15, 2018 • Written by

Web Accessibility Initiative Guidelines

The World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) has developed guidelines for ensuring web accessibility. These guidelines includes the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG).

Understanding WCAG 2.0 – The current ISO Standard for producing web accessible content.

WebAIM’s WCAG 2.0 Checklist for HTML documents – A checklist for complying with WCAG 2.0 guidelines.

Understanding WCAG 2.1 – WCAG 2.1 is built on and extends WCAG 2.0. It is currently in review.

Silver – successor to WCAG is in development.

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview

  • Making authoring tools accessible for people with disabilities so they can create web content
  • Helping authors produce accessible content

Guidelines and Standards

18F Accessibility Guide – United States Government Accessibility Guide

U.S. Web Design System – United States Government Web Accessibility standards

A11Y Style Guide – A living style guide for beginners to experts

Clear Print Accessibility Guidelines –  accessible print guidelines developed by Canadian National Institute of the Blind (CNIB)

Toolkits and Resources

GOV.UK Accessibility blog – UK Government’s accessibility blog covered under Open Government Licence (OGL) and Creative Commons (CC)

Educator’s Accessibility Toolkit – Accessible Campus for universities to meet their obligations of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Accessibility Hub – Queen’s University

Includes:

  • Accessible documents and forms
  • Website accessibility
  • Social Media accessibility
  • Video accessibility

Web and Digital Accessibility articles

Introduction to Web Accessibility – An introduction to web accessibility by WebAIM: Web Accessibility in Mind

Users, Disabilities and Web Accessibility – articles by WebAIM: Web Accessibility in Mind

Accessibility & Me – An introduction to web accessibility

Introduction to Web Accessibility  – Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI), World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

The A11Y Project – A community-driven effort to make web accessibility easier: How-tos, myths, quick tests, quick tips, Assistive Technology, basics

24 Accessibility – Articles on all subjects related to digital accessibility

Accessibility Laws and Standards

February 13, 2018 • Written by

Canadian Accessibility Laws

Ontario became the first Canadian jurisdiction to enact accessibility legislation with the passing of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 2005. Nova Scotia passed the Nova Scotia Accessibility Act in 2017 and is currently conducting public consultations to inform the development of their accessibility standards. The Government of Canada conducted public consultations in 2016 and 2017 to inform the development of a federal accessibility act. Legislation is expected to be presented to parliament in spring 2018.

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

In 2010, Canada ratified the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) which protects the rights of persons with disabilities by ensuring they are full and equal members of society. It also covers related issues such as poverty, mental health, and barriers for girls and women with disabilities.

International Standards and Laws

United States

  • United States Workforce Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was enacted during the Vietnam War to address the needs of disabled veterans. The act ensures access to education and the built environment for people with disabilities.
  • Americans with Disabilities (ADA), (1990) ensures that electronic & information technology must be accessible to people with disabilities (rev. 2010).
  • Section 508, Amendment to United States Workforce Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (rev. 1998), addresses the procurement of information and communication technologies (ICT), including hardware, software and documentation, by federal government agencies. It also ensures that electronic and information technology is accessible to people with disabilities, including employees and members of the public. The act also applies to ICT vendors and suppliers who do business with federal government agencies.

Australia

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) (1992) provides protection for everyone in Australia against discrimination based on disability, which includes education, employment, built environment, housing, provision of goods and services, and sport.

United Kingdom

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) (1995) is a civil rights laws that made it unlawful to discriminate against people with disabilities in terms of employment, the delivery of goods and services, education and transport.It was repealed and replaced by the Equality Act 2010, except in Northern Ireland, where the DDA still applies. The Equality Act 2010 addresses discrimination based on disability, gender, race, religion and sexual orientation.

Europe

EN 301 549, Mandate 376 (2014) is the first European Standard for accessible information and communication technologies (ICT). Mandate 376 is intended for use by public authorities and public sector bodies in the procurement of ICT to ensure that websites, software, digital devices are more accessible for use by persons with a wide range of abilities. Although Mandate 376 is voluntary and non-binding, it is an effort to harmonize the accessibility requirements specified in public procurement in Member States.

7 Principles of Inclusive Design webinar

February 12, 2018 • Written by

Inclusive Design

Inclusive Design is about putting people first. It’s about designing for the needs of people with permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities — all of us really. In this webinar Henny Swan will introduce the 7 principles and how they can be used alongside standards and guidelines, to take products beyond compliance.

Presenter

Henny Swan is an Accessibility Specialist with over 12 years experience in inclusive design. She is a Senior Accessibility User Experience Specialist at The Paciello Group (TPG) and prior to that worked on cross device media player accessibility at the BBC as well as developing BBC Mobile Accessibility Standards and Guidelines.

The webinar

This webinar is relevant to anyone involved in the design and development of web content and digital environments — instructors, designers, developers, and policy makers responsible for Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) activities.

TLTC and eTV are hosting this webinar on Wednesday, February 21 from 10:15-11:30 a.m. in eTV studio B. Register to attend this webinar.

If you are unable to attend this webinar at eTV or prefer to participate on your own you can register online.

For more information contact Jim Hounslow.

Inclusive Design Resources

February 12, 2018 • Written by

Inclusive Design Resources

A collection of resources to support the 7 Principles of Inclusive Design webinar.

Articles and Blogs

Inclusive Design Principles – Henny Swan, Ian Pouncey, Heydon Pickering, Léonie Watson, The Paciello Group (TPG)

Inclusive Design Principles and how to use them – Henny Swan, The Paciello Group (TPG)

Women in UX: Meet Henny Swan, Advocate for UX Inclusivity – Henny Swan’s tips for creating more inclusive UX designs

If you want the best design, ask strangers to help – Jutta Trevirans, professor and director, Inclusive Design Research Centre (IRDC), OCADU

IHENI – Henny Swan’s blog

Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC)  – OCADU

Video

An Introduction to Inclusive Design – Microsoft Design

Inclusive – Microsoft Design

Empathy – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design Principles – Henny Swan : #ID24 2017 – The principles of Inclusive Design, The Paciello Group (TPG)

Henny Swan – The Velvet Rope – #NUX5 – Accessibility and Inclusive Design, The Paciello Group (TPG)

a11yTO Conference – Henny Swan on the principles of Inclusive Design (starts at 34:33)

Toolkits

Microsoft Inclusive Design: toolkit, activities and resources – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design Toolkit – University of Cambridge

Inclusive Design – Barclays Bank

Posters

Inclusive Design Principles (compressed zip file) – The Paciello Group (TPG)

Inclusive Design Principles single poster – Barclays Bank

Inclusive Design Principles individual posters – Barclays Bank

On Twitter

@paciellogroup – The Paciello Group (TPG), accessibility testing/evaluation, compliance audits, and training.

@iheni – Henny Swan, accessibility specialist, The Paciello Group (TPG)

@LeonieWatson – Léonie Watson, accessibility engineer, The Paciello Group (TPG)

@idrc_ocadu – Inclusive Design Research Centre (IRDC), OCADU

@JuttaTrevira – Jutta Trevirans, professor and director, Inclusive Design Research Centre (IRDC), OCADU

Accessibility Account Settings in LEARN

October 19, 2017 • Written by

There are a few personal Account Settings that can be configured for your LEARN experience.

Access these settings by first logging into LEARN, click your name in the upper right-hand corner of the page, and click “Account Settings”.
Selecting Account Settings in LEARN

Font Options

You are able to adjust the font size, as well as select the “OpenDyslexic” font to improve readability.
Adjusting font settings in LEARN

Settings for Assistive Technologies

Dialog Setting

By default, secondary windows are displayed in Dialog boxes. You may wish to change this to Pop-ups if you use an assistive technology (such as a screen reader, screen magnifier or voice software).
Dialog Settings in LEARN

HTML Editor Settings

You can opt to turn off the rich text editor in LEARN. The HTML editor enables you to enter text and HTML in the system. It has many additional rich text features. If you use assistive technology such as screen readers, some of these features might be difficult to navigate.

Reading Content

Some tools automatically mark content as read as you scroll it into view. If you use an assistive technology such as a screen reader then you may wish to disable this feature.

Video Settings

There is an option to optimize video presentation for programmatically-driven assistive technologies.

Discussions and Email Settings

Though not specifically accessibility settings, you are able to customize your experience using Discussions and Email within LEARN.

Access these settings by the corresponding tabs at the top of the page.
Discussion and Email account settings in LEARN