Are we ready for the next pandemic?

January 14, 2014 • Written by

Unlike the seasonal flu virus, “the pandemic influenza virus can cause severe complications, such as pneumonia and death in people who were otherwise healthy. For unknown reasons, influenza pandemics generally occur three to four times a century” (source: Public Health Agency of Canada). In fact, pandemics of various kinds have killed more people than all wars combined. Now… are we ready for the next one?

Videos from RRC Library

With the H1N1 business in the news lately, perhaps you want to delve further into the subject. Check out the videos below to learn about pandemics and get a glimpse of what a modern scenario would look like.

Outbreak: anatomy of a plague / National Film Board of Canada, Discovery Channel Canada, Radio-Canada Television.

Outbreak: anatomy of a plague / National Film Board of Canada, Discovery Channel Canada, Radio-Canada Television.

Outbreak: Anatomy of a Plague

Juxtaposing a 21st-century scenario against the 1885 smallpox epidemic in Montreal, Outbreak features interviews with leading experts to trace the possible trajectory of a modern plague.

(2010, 86 min.)

 

 

 

 

 

Killer flu / Educational Broadcasting Corp.

Killer flu / Educational Broadcasting Corp.

Killer Flu

Discusses the 1918 flu pandemic, its deadly consequences and the possibility that a similar strain could occur today.

(2004, 60 min.)

 

 

 

 

Black dawn: the next pandemic / Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Black dawn: the next pandemic / Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Black Dawn: the Next Pandemic

Features leading epidemiologists, doctors and emergency planners who envisage the impact of avian flu spreading around the world. The scenario is a fictional account, but based on scientific fact and actual research and pandemic preparedness efforts.

(2006, 52 min.)

 

 

 

If you have any questions or want to find related media on the subject, please contact Media Services at the Notre Dame Campus Library at media@rrc.ca or 204-632-2231.

RRC Library Acquires New Video Series: Economics USA

January 6, 2014 • Written by

Economics USA: 21st Century Edition

This new video series on micro- and macroeconomics recently arrived at Red River College Library. Each of the 28 titles spans 30 minutes and focuses on a specific aspect of economics. Viewers are offered a discussion, historical background, commentary and analysis, along with input from experts in the field. The award-winning series comes “highly recommended” in a review by Michael J. Coffta, Business Librarian at Bloomsberg University of Pennsylvania.

Below is a snapshot of one title from the series called “Federal Deficits: Can We Live with Them?” Both Video on Demand and DVD formats are available.

Snapshot of “Federal Deficits” from Economics USA Series…

During World War II, America's national debt more than quadrupled. The government encouraged citizens to buy war bonds and federal stamps to help defray the costs.During World War II, America’s national debt more than quadrupled. The government encouraged citizens to buy war bonds and federal stamps to help defray the costs.


In 1960, President Eisenhower achieved a surplus. President Nixon argued that a growing economy actually required a deficit, and many economists agreed. In reality, the budget surplus was holding money out of the economy causing workers to lose their jobs.

In 1960, President Eisenhower achieved a surplus. President Nixon argued that a growing economy actually required a deficit, and many economists agreed. In reality, the budget surplus was holding money out of the economy causing workers to lose their jobs.


Economic analyst Richard Gill discusses counter-cyclical policy: the idea of producing budget deficits in bad times and budget surpluses in good times in an effort to stabilize the economy.

Economic analyst Richard Gill discusses counter-cyclical policy: the idea of producing budget deficits in bad times and budget surpluses in good times in an effort to stabilize the economy.


After a large tax cut, three wars, a down market, and expensive entitlement costs, the deficit and the national debt reached unsustainable heights. Increases in spending and decreases in taxes have been funded through borrowing... but borrowing has a cost to it – interest.After a large tax cut, three wars, a down market, and expensive entitlement costs, the deficit and the national debt reached unsustainable heights. Increases in spending and decreases in taxes have been funded through borrowing… but borrowing has a cost to it – interest.


How to fix the deficit and how to balance the budget are complicated questions. The deficit is staggering and the mission to find a solution is urgent and still unsolved.

How to fix the deficit and how to balance the budget are complicated questions. The deficit is staggering and the mission to find a solution is urgent and still unsolved.


Politics make reducing the deficit tricky because no one wants to see cuts to programs that benefit their lives. Everyone has to sacrifice but no one wants to. Can a compromise on the budget ever be reached?

Politics make reducing the deficit tricky because no one wants to see cuts to programs that benefit their lives. Everyone has to sacrifice but no one wants to. Can a compromise on the budget ever be reached?


Conclusion: The Situation is Urgent and Unsolved

America’s deficit is staggering and the mission to find a solution is urgent and still unsolved. Every year, the USA uses a good part of their annual budget just to pay the interest on the debt, but they also keep accumulating debt. In 2011, the Treasury Department asked congress to increase the nation’s debt ceiling to over 14.3 trillion dollars. Can the USA continue on this course? Absolutely not. Are deficits always bad? No, they are not.

Explore further…

If you have any questions, please contact Media Services at the Notre Dame Campus Library at media@rrc.ca or 204-632-2231.

Holiday Reading – Award Winning Books

December 10, 2013 • Written by

holiday reading 2013

It’s always nice to relax at this time of the year, and there’s no better way to relax than to dive into a good book.  During the upcoming holidays, why not take some time for yourself and read one of the many award winning books that are available in RRC’s Library. To view the present and past winners, come visit the Library Window Display at the Notre Dame Campus.

This year’s winners include:

  • Indian-HorseThe Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (winner of the Governor General’s Award for Fiction and the Man Booker Prize)
  • The Lion Seeker by Kenneth Bonert (winner of the ScotiaBank Giller Prize)
  • Northwest Passage by Stan Rogers (Governor General’s Award for Children’s Literature, Illustration)
  • This is not my Hat by Jon Klassen. (Caldecott Award for Illustration)
  • Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese.( Burt Award for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Literature)

Also, check out our many titles by Alice Munro winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Click here to see a list of all the award winning books that are currently in the Notre Dame Campus Library window display.

The Library is Here to Help You!

November 28, 2013 • Written by
Lower Learning Commons at the Exchange District Campus – Includes movable workspaces that have LAN jacks and power outlets. Many of the tables can be moved to accommodate larger groups. There are also two breakout rooms here for quieter study. The Commons is available to students until 11:45 pm and 24/7 during exam time.

Lower Learning Commons at the Exchange District Campus – Includes movable workspaces that have LAN jacks and power outlets. Many of the tables can be moved to accommodate larger groups. There are also two breakout rooms here for quieter study. The Commons is available to students until 11:45 pm and 24/7 during exam time.

What is a library? It’s a collection of books, right? Maybe not…

At Red River College this is only partially true.  Of course we have books, we have thousands of books. However, your library is more than just books!

At Red River College we have two full-service libraries.  At the Notre Dame Campus we are located in the centre of the campus on the mall level of Building C across from the Student Association offices and the student store (The Ox).  Downtown, at the Exchange District Campus, the John and Bonnie Buhler Library is located above the Buhler Learning Commons, on the second floor, near the southeast corner of the Roblin Centre.

In case you didn’t know, here are some services that we offer at both locations:

  • Library  Resources
    • We have over 75,000
      Stacks and stacks of periodicals at the Notre Dame Campus Library.

      Stacks and stacks of periodicals at the Notre Dame Campus Library.

      titles – books, journals, reports, government publications – in print format;  over 5000 video and DVD titles (mostly videos); and over 2,000 items of equipment, including TVs, VCRs, DVD players, data video projectors, visual presenters, and digital cameras.

  • Reference services
    • Are you inexperienced in locating resources?  Are you looking for certain resources, but you have been unsuccessful? Ask our Reference Desk professionals for help!  They’re jobs is to help you find the library resources you need, whether it be a book, journal article, video or even a web resource.
  • Computer Labs
    • Each Library has open access computers and offers support in the use of computers and computing resources.
  • Printing and Photocopying
    • Would you want to use a computer or print an assignment? How about a photocopier? Come to the Library!
  • Technical Help
    • Maybe you’d like to connect to the Wireless and you’re not sure how to do it?  Maybe your RRC password doesn’t work anymore?   Come to one of our helpdesks!  We are ready to help you. 
      • NDC Campus :  Help is located in the Library Classroom, open from 8AM-4PM
      • Downtown Campus:  Located in the Roblin Centre, at the Learning Commons Helpdesk, from 8AM-4PM.
  • Study Areas
    • We have study areas in all of our locations.  Come on down to the library and study!
      • Notre Dame Campus:  Study tables, some with laptop connections, are available throughout the library. The library is divided into two types of study area, group and individual. Group study tables are on the north side and a quiet area with individual study carrels is on the south side. There is also a quiet reading area on the south side. If you are wondering which study is best for you, just ask at the front desk.
      • Exchange District Campus:  Study tables, all with laptop connections, are available throughout the Learning Commons, including the Library.  A quiet reading area is available in the Periodicals room within the Library. The Lower Learning commons contains seating for 65 at tables with laptop connections.  As well, breakout rooms (small group study rooms) are located in the Learning Commons, mostly in the Library.

Would you like to know more?   Visit our web site: http://library.rrc.ca Or, come to one of our library locations, either at the Notre Dame Campus, or at our location downtown in the Roblin Centre, and just ask.

We are here to help you!

Library Window Display: Transgender Day of Remembrance

November 13, 2013 • Written by
Library Window Display: Transgender Day of Remembrance: LGBTT*

Library Window Display: Transgender Day of Remembrance

November 20th is Transgender Day of Remembrance.  It is a day that was established to memorialize those who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice.  The Transgender Day of Remembrance raises public awareness of hate crimes against transgender people and also gives a moment when people can stop and memorialize those who have died by anti-transgender violence. (Source: http://www.transgenderdor.org/)

Visit our the Notre Dame Campus Window Display

To increase awareness on this issue, the LGBTT* Initiative and Library Services set up a LGBTT* library window display at Notre Dame Campus where you can find information about Transgender Day of Remembrance, terminology about gender identity, locations of the gender neutral washrooms at the College.

As well, the RRC Library has many LGBTT* themed items in its collection. Check out some of the items that are currently on display in the Notre Dame Campus window display.

Library Art Contest Winners

November 8, 2013 • Written by

In October, as a celebration of Canadian Library Month, the Library invited Red River College students to show off their artistic talent by illustrating a 3 X 5 library index card from our old card catalogue.

Now that the contest is complete, we’d like to present the entries of our two winners below:

by Jo Shepherd

by Jo Shepherd

by Jo Shepherd

by Jo Shepherd

By David Pelland

By David Pelland

By David Pelland

By David Pelland

Congratulations to Jo Shepherd and David Pelland! Both winners will receive a Red River College Bookstore gift card.

David Pelland (left) receiving his prize from Norman Beattie, Coordinator of Public Services, Notre Dame Campus Library

David Pelland (left) receiving his prize from Norman Beattie, Coordinator of Public Services, Notre Dame Campus Library

Jolene Shepherd (left) receiving her prize from Phyllis Barich,  Coordinator, Exchange District Campus Library

Jolene Shepherd (left) receiving her prize from Phyllis Barich, Coordinator, Exchange District Campus Library

In Remembrance

November 4, 2013 • Written by

With Remembrance Day fast approaching we’d like to introduce a part of our library collection which addresses the thoughts of many Canadians throughout “Veteran’s Week”:

Equal to the challenge : an anthology of women’s experiences during World War II

Equal to the challenge : an anthology of women's experiences during World War IIPresents stories by 55 Canadian women of their experiences during World War II. Personal wartime accounts are told by women who worked as civilians, as members of social service groups, and as members of the Canadian armed forces. An introduction discusses women’s roles in the armed forces, and how their wartime contributions influenced general attitudes toward women as equal members of society.

 

 

Fifteen days : stories of bravery, friendship, life and death from inside the new Canadian ArmyFifteen days : stories of bravery, friendship, life and death from inside the new Canadian Army

Grounded in insights gained over the course of several trips to Afghanistan, and drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews not only with the service-men and -women but with the commanders and family members as well, Christie Blatchford creates a detailed, complex and deeply affecting picture of military life in the twenty-first century.

 

 

 

For King and Kanata : Canadian Indians and the First World WarFor King and Kanata : Canadian Indians and the First World War

Reveals how national and international forces directly influenced the more than 4,000 status Indians who voluntarily served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force between 1914 and 1919 and how subsequent administrative policies profoundly affected their experiences at home, on the battlefield, and as returning veterans.

 

 

A place of honour : Manitoba's war dead commemorated in its geographyA place of honour : Manitoba’s war dead commemorated in its geography

Prepared by Manitoba Geographical Names Program this publication tells about all geographical features named after war Manitoban war casualties.  If you are doing some family research or trying to do some remembrance on your own, this book is a great place to start.

 

 

Invisible women : WWII Aboriginal servicewomen in CanadaInvisible women : WWII Aboriginal servicewomen in Canada

While there is anecdotal reporting on Aboriginal involvement, in recent years due to more Indigenous history being written, there is some new research on Aboriginal peoples in WWII, but mainly the Aboriginal male experience. There is practically nothing written about the Aboriginal female experience. Where are their voices? What are their stories?

 

A poppy is to rememberA poppy is to remember

Each Remembrance Day we honour those who gave so much to serve their country, and those who risk their lives even today, in many troubled areas of the world. With simple yet resonant words and illustrations, A Poppy Is to Remember reminds us why we wear the poppy so proudly on Remembrance Day.  (Children’s Book)

Library Art Contest

October 15, 2013 • Written by

card-norman

October is Canadian Library Month. The Library would like to invite you to show off your artistic talent by illustrating a 3 X 5 library index card.

prizesRULES:

  • Open to all RRC students
  • Choose up to 3 cards from any Library location.
  • Illustrate the FRONT of the card incorporating the card’s wording and/or concept. Ideally, keeping the words visible.
  • Use any physical media (i.e. crayon, coloured pencils, macaroni, multi-media, etc.) and style of art.
  • Write your name and contact information clearly on the back.

Entries will be judged on:

  • Quality of the artwork.
  • Artistic interpretation.
  • Creativity.
  • Medium.

Submission

  • Entries must be submitted to either Library location by 4:30 pm on Friday November 1.
  • Winning cards and honourable mentions will be displayed in the Library. (Cards will not be returned.)

Examples

card examples

To view examples go to:  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/08/library-services/how-to-host-a-card-catalog-contest/

For More Information

Check out our posters throughout the campus.  If you have any further questions you are invited to make inquiries at any of our Library Reference Desks.

October is Canadian Library Month

September 26, 2013 • Written by

webad_CLA

People!  Ideas!  Communities!  Information!  Canada’s libraries foster connections between people, ideas, communities, and information.

In October, these types of connections will be celebrated during Canadian Library Month. This year’s theme is “Libraries Connect”, highlighting how libraries enable people to connect with others, foster the development of ideas, and promote the growth of strong communities.

At this very moment, from coast to coast to coast, Canadian libraries are connecting people with information, providing endless opportunity to people in our diverse communities. For generations, libraries and librarians have worked at the grass roots level, providing services to communities. Today, in Canada, over 23,000 librarians and library clerks serve in over 22,000 libraries in incredibly diverse communities, from major metropolitan areas to towns and rural hamlets, from research‐intensive universities to colleges of art and design.

As well, academic libraries, school libraries and special libraries add to the creativity and personal, professional and academic growth of many Canadians. These libraries serve everyone from students and faculty to those working in the corporate, government, legal and non‐profit sectors.

For additional information please refer to the Canadian Library Month Website:
http://cla.pwwebhost.com/CLM13/

Do you want to get on wireless?

September 24, 2013 • Written by

Wireless at RRCThe Red River College Library receives plenty of inquiries about the wireless networks here on our campuses.  As usual we try to answer all of our Patron’s questions, though it must be said that we do not control or manage the wireless networks here at RRC.  At the Library we are users, just like you!

In fact, it is the Information Technology Department that manages the wireless networks at the Notre Dame Campus and throughout the Exchange District Campus.   However, though we do not control the system,  the Library can still provide some assistance in this matter.

Lesson #1: If you can’t connect, make sure you are in an area where there is coverage

First of all, users should know where the wireless access points are located. Wireless is fully available throughout the Roblin Centre and the Patterson Global Institute at the Exchange District Campus.  In the Notre Dame Campus full wireless coverage is available in Buildings A, C, D, E, F and Z and certain common areas, such as the Library, the cafeterias (Buffalo, Voyageur, Otto’s, Hard Drive ), the Cave Lounge, and the North and South Gyms.  There is only partial wireless coverage in buildings M, J and B.

Lesson #2: Make sure you use your correct username and password

Windows 8 allows you to store your username and password

Windows 8 allows you to store your username and password

Additionally, Staff and students should connect through the Wireless Network named RRCWireless.  You should take note that this network does not operate like an open wireless, such as the wireless at “Starbucks” or “McDonald’s”. A user needs to enter their credentials to obtain a connection. When challenged, use your normal RRC network username and password to login.  If you are having troubles, please review more detailed instructions on our web page, as connections may sometimes be tricky.

As for devices, iPhones and iPads usually connect very easily.  Just enter your RRC username and password and you are usually connected in seconds.  Other operating systems, such as Android, may require additional settings.  Further, devices such as Kobo may have trouble connecting as they normally do not have the correct WPA2 protocol required for a connection.  Please refer to our webpage for more detailed info and instructions.

Lesson #3: Don’t use RRCGUEST!

Staff and students should connect through the Wireless Network named RRCWireless.  Do not connect to RRCGUEST.

A common problem that occurs is users try to connect to the network named “RRCGUEST”.  This network is for guests to the college and is not meant to be used by students and/or staff.

Connections to “RRCGUEST” require a special username and a password that must be obtained  in advance, by making a CASELOG request to Information Technology Solutions.  The Library does not know any of the usernames and/or passwords and we cannot issue you with one.

Conclusion

Please note, those staff and students that have College-issued laptops and devices, should submit a Caselog if they have troubles connecting to the Wireless network.  However, the RRC IT Department cannot support those that have personal devices.  If you have a personal device and you just can’t seem to get it connected to the RRCWIreless then come to our Helpdesk in the Lower Learning Commons of the Roblin Centre, or to the Help Desk in the Library Computer Lab at the Notre Dame Campus.  Our staff is available from 8:00AM to 4:00 PM and they are great at helping students with these types of problems.

Reference: Library Help and Guides – Red River College Wireless