Forget this Network! Reconnecting to RRCWireless

September 8, 2014 • Written by

Wireless at RRCThe Red River College Library receives plenty of inquiries about the wireless networks on all our Winnipeg campuses. Our goal is to help all our library patrons, though we always have to be clear that we do not control or manage the wireless networks here at RRC. At the Library we are users, just like you!

In fact, it is the Information Technology Department that manages the wireless networks at the Notre Dame Campus and throughout the Exchange District Campus.

Are you a Returning Student? Forget this Network!

forget

If you are, you likely had to reset your password over the summer. When you return to the college, make sure that any of your devices, such as cell phones or tablets, also have your new password in their settings.

Q: How do you do update your wireless password?
A: Forget this network!

Just ask your device to “Forget this Network” and then setup the network fresh.

Lockouts

When you ask your device to “forget this network”, always keep in mind that it was likely trying to actively connect to the wireless with a bad password. This would have caused the college’s wireless system to lock out your device. So, when you reconnect with your username and your new password it may still not connect. It is probably locked out!

Wait 30 minutes after you “Forget this Network” for your locked-out device to be re-allowed to connect to RRCWireless.

Laptops – Mac and PC

If you have a laptop, you may not need to “Forget this Network”.  You can likely just login with your new password when your computer challenges you for credentials.  However, you may still have to wait 30 minutes for your laptop to cease being locked out.  Just put in your new password, and wait for the lock-out period to expire (30 minutes).

Additional Help

We offer additional help at our Library Helpdesks:

  • Notre Dame Campus – Library Computer Lab (8AM to 4PM)
  • Exchange District Campus – Lower Learning Commons (8AM to 4PM)

As well we have a web page with extensive wireless resources and guides: http://library.rrc.ca/Help-and-Guides/Wireless.aspx

Red River College Libraries will live stream #TEDxManitoba

June 4, 2014 • Written by

tedx-logo-headerTEDxManitoba is a locally organized conference in its fourth year.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

When: June 12, 2014  (Speakers scheduled 9:00AM – 4:30 PM)
Where: Tom Hendry Warehouse Theatre, 140 Rupert Avenue
Web:  http://tedxmanitoba.com/

For individuals interested in attending, tickets are no longer available, however, on June 12th you may still connect to watch the live stream on the TEDxManitoba.com web site.

The Red River College Library will be live streaming TEDx Manitoba at both the Notre Dame and the Exchange District Campus Library locations.  Come on down and enjoy a few TED talks with us!

List of Speakers

Hosted by emcees, Aisha and Ismaila Alfa, TEDxManitoba 2014 will be a day full of big ideas, passionate stories, life reflections, insights and expertise.

The 2014 TEDxManitoba speakers include: (subject to change)

  • Ali Ashtari, PhD: Head of Research at Invenia and Canadian immigrant
  • Brian Bowman: Partner with Winnipeg’s Pitblado Law
  • Angela Cassie: Director, Communications and External Relations at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  • Pay Chen: Toronto-based radio and television host, producer and writer
  • David Gingera: Founder and President of urban agriculture venture CitiGrow
  • Althea Guiboche: Winnipeg single parent, poet and author battling homelessness and poverty
  • Joe Kalturynk: Founding director of RAW:Gallery of Architecture and Design and Founding partner and designer of RAW:almond 2013/14
  • Jo MacDonald: Winnipeg educator
  • Andrew John Milne: Winnipeg artist technologist
  • Leif Norman: Full time commercial and event photographer
  • Sandi Reimer: Administrative professional for the Province of Manitoba and inspirational runner
  • David Samborski: Engineer and writer
  • Nick Skytland: Houston-based open innovation, data and technology consultant
  • Chris Summerville: CEO of the Schizophrenia Society and Executive Director of the Manitoba Schizophrenia Society
  • Ted Geddert: Builder of well-designed and architecturally inspiring prefab houses

Stay connected for additional TEDxManitoba information

Watch for Live Tweets from @RRCLibrary!

Mark Nelson from the Red River College Library will be in attendance and live tweeting #TedXManitoba on the @RRCLibrary Twitter account.  Twitter users are invited to follow along and engage!

What was discussed at past TEDxManitoba sessions?

You may watch many of the previous presentations on the TEDxManitoba Youtube Channel, including this wonderful presentation shown below.

 

 

Pride Week at RRC

May 13, 2014 • Written by
Check out the displays at the Notre Dame Campus and the Exchange District Campus Libraries

Check out the displays at the Notre Dame Campus and the Exchange District Campus Libraries

In preparation for Pride Week (May 23-June1) and to increase awareness about LGBTT* matters, the Red River College Library and the LGBTT* Initiative have prepared LGBTT* displays in the Notre Dame Campus Library window display and at the Exchange District Campus Library display area (in front of the Circulation Desk).

The displays include information about LGBTT* terminology and affirmative language, the LGBTT* Initiative at Red River College, LGBTT* services and programs in the local community, and many other educational resources. Check them out!

Pride Week Events

In the coming weeks there are several RRC related Pride Week events that you should be aware of:

GEN-SILENTThursday, May 29: As part of Pride Week, University of Winnipeg Students’ Association LGBT* Centre and Red River College’s LGBTT* Initiative are delighted to host a free joint educational event and will present the documentary Gen Silent. This film asks six LGBT* seniors if they will hide their friends, their spouses- their entire lives in order to survive in the care system. The film discovers how oppression in the years before Stonewall now affects older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people with fear and isolation. The program begins at 7:00 pm at University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue (The Hive). Venue is fully accessible. For more information, contact Nora Sobel, Diversity Initiatives Coordinator at nsobel@rrc.ca.

Sunday, June 1: Pride Winnipeg will hit the streets for the 27th annual Pride Parade. Red River College will again be participating with a large group of energetic volunteers that walk along the parade route carrying Rainbow flags and a large College banner. For more information, please contact Janice Manson, Events Coordinator at jmanson@rrc.ca. For more information on the Pride Parade and Festival, visit www.pridewinnipeg.com/festival/parade/

Tuesday, June 10: As part of College Days, the LGBTT* Initiative presents an Ally Practice Session (Only for Allies). This is a half-day educational session for College Allies who have already attended a 1-day Ally Training and now are interested to further advance their Ally Skills. Participants will analyze different scenarios in the College environment, practice role-play activities, and develop Ally strategies.

To attend this Ally Practice Session, please register online at https://blogs.rrc.ca/diversity/lgbtt-initiative-ally-practice-session-only-for-allies/ before May 23, 2014. The session has space for 20 participants. For more information, please contact Nora Sobel, Diversity Initiatives Coordinator at nsobel@rrc.ca or 204-632-2404.

For more information

For more information about the LGBTT* Initiative at Red River College, please contact Nora Sobel, Diversity Initiatives Coordinator at nsobel@rrc.ca, 204.632.2404, or visit www.rrc.ca/LGBTT

A Revolutionary Idea: Reading for Fun

April 28, 2014 • Written by

 

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies,” said Jojen.

“The man who never reads lives only one.”

―     George R.R. Martin,   A Dance with Dragons

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From the Recreational Reading Book – Exchange District Campus Library

At first glance it seems a Recreational Reading Book Exchange located in an academic library might cause some confusion.  There are already books therefore why have a place for potboilers, romances, and fantasy?  Besides already drawing you into the library after noticing book four in A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Marin, why not stay for the crash-course on how to search a database at the reference desk.  It’s not an outlandish idea, in fact many colleges and universities have developed their own leisure reading programs for students.

While Red River finds itself only minutes from the Millennium Library, some students may not be eligible for a library card.  If time is tight, money for students feels even tighter, to the point that $12.99 paperback looks like a splurge.  For others, myself included, it’s a case of books taking up space in personal libraries.  Perhaps it’s time to part with a copy, and hope it ends up as someone’s latest discovery.  The Recreational Reading Book Exchange may fulfill all those needs, and also enhances academic achievement in ways like:

  • increase your reading skills
  • increase vocabulary
  • help your writing skills
  • broaden reading horizons and cultural literacy

(-From Library Stocks Up on Leisure Reading, University of Guelph)

IMG_5972

Some comfy places to sit
Periodical Reading Room,John and Bonnie Buhler Library, Exchange District Campus

On April 24th the library solicited donations as part of the Red River College EcoFair proving donating gently used books also helps support the environment as well.  However, we take donations year round at both campuses, in any genre, for that one moment a reader wants a break from textbooks for a quick trip to New York, Northern Ontario, or Westeros.

Related Reading

At Your Leisure: Establishing a Popular Reading Collection at UBC Library
by Bailey Diers & Shannon Simpson

Why Your Academic Library Needs a Popular Reading Collection Now More Than Ever
By Pauline Dewan (EBSChost Database-Login Required)

Earth Day at NDC

April 16, 2014 • Written by

earth day

Red River College will once again be celebrating Earth Day.  You would be smart to watch for events throughout all campuses.

At the Notre Dame Campus, the Library will be participating in the “Sustainable Living EcoFair” which will be held in the Library Hallway on Thursday, April 24, between 11:00am – 2:00pm.  You may visit more than ten sustainability booths and enjoy some delicious local foods. Come on down and compete in some rousing sustainability games!

Library “Book Exchange” and “Plastic bag round up”!

If you bring a book, you may take a book!  We will accept ANY gently used book, not just fiction.  It’s that simple, and it’s a great way to reuse pre-loved and pre-enjoyed books.

Do you have plastic bags to recycle? The first 50 people to bring in a bunch of plastic shopping bags will receive a free reusable bag courtesy of the RRC Library.

When: Thursday, April 24, between 11:00am – 2:00pm
Two Locations: Library Hallway (NDC)  /  In the Atrium near Print Services (EDC)

NDC Library Window Display

Check out the colourful “Earth Day” display at the Notre Dame Library.  We are featuring many fantastic items from our collection.

The entire list of items in our Window Display is located here: http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

The Earth’s blanket : traditional teachings for sustainable living
earthsblanketEarly in the twentieth century, ethnographer James Teit wrote of the belief among the Nlaka’pmx people that plants and grasses are the blanket of the earth, and that if too much vegetation is destroyed, the earth weeps. In The Earth’s Blanket, ethnobotanist Nancy J. Turner explores the wealth of ecological knowledge and the spiritual connection to the natural world that is fundamental to indigenous cultures. Turner has worked with Aboriginal peoples in North America for more than twenty-five years, and her indigenous teachers have allowed her to share their perspectives about the natural world. Their teachings describe a rich variety of methods of harvesting – while maintaining and enhancing – our natural resources. More than just stories, these narratives underlie a belief system that informs everyday attitudes toward the earth.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100631

environmental problem solvingEnvironmental problem solving : a how-to guide
This book teaches those on both sides of the table to address their own preconceptions and approach hard issues critically, methodically, and fairly. Hughes combines aspects of the decision-making process from the fields of business, management, and communication science based on extensive research and ample practical experience in the field and classroom. He creates a logical framework to help guide thinking from identifying a problem to finding its solution. Using examples drawn from real-life situations, Environmental Problem Solving will become an invaluable guide for environmentalists, agency professionals, consultants, students, naturalists, and concerned citizens.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=99343

Everything under the sun : toward a brighter future on a small blue planet
EverythingSunCoverFinal.inddIn this latest offering from David Suzuki, the well-known scientist, author, and broadcaster explores the interconnectedness of the world’s myriad environmental challenges. The solutions are there, he argues; we just need the will to act together to bring about change. Suzuki delves into such provocative topics as the difference between human hunters and other predators, our dependence on the sun, and what we must learn from Japan’s recent reactor meltdown. He also doesn’t avoid controversial opinion, especially when it comes to taking on those who stand in the way of resolving serious issues like climate change.  Everything Under the Sun includes telling facts and stats, the latest scientific findings, and examples of the positive actions people are taking today toward protecting what we have. Underpinning it all is the recognition that Earth gives us everything we require to live, under a sun that provides the energy to produce food, transport, and all of our modern conveniences.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=117378

get outGet out! : 150 easy ways for kids and grown-ups to get into nature and build a greener future
Chockful of ideas to get families, classrooms, and groups outside learning about nature, experiencing the world in new ways, and taking a hands-on approach to the three r’s (reduce, reuse, recycle). Chapters on being a green consumer and green eater, as well as on choosing an issue and taking a stand, make for a well-rounded yet easy-to-use handbook for making a difference indoors and out. Open to any page to find something to do today. The payoff is huge: Not only is nature just plain awesome to be in, research shows that spending time outdoors can actually improve our physical and emotional health.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=113572

Seven rules for sustainable communities : design strategies for the post-carbon world
pc_sevenrulesbook_coverNo other book so clearly connects the form of our cities to their ecological, economic, and social consequences. No other book takes on this breadth of complex and contentious issues and distills them down to such convincing and practical solutions. And no other book so vividly compares and contrasts the differing experiences of U.S. and Canadian cities. Of particular new importance is how city form affects the production of planet-warming greenhouse gases. The author explains this relationship in an accessible way, and goes on to show how conforming to seven simple rules for community design could literally do a world of good.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=114995

Red River College Library’s Sustainability Initiatives

April 16, 2014 • Written by

we recycleRed River College (RRC) has a growing reputation as one of Canada’s greenest employers, thanks especially to its Sustainability Initiatives: http://blogs.rrc.ca/redgreen/

As an integral part of the College, the Library is no exception and practices sustainability in its everyday operations, such as purchasing environmentally friendly products whenever possible for its own supplies. These include paper products with recycled content, refillable pens, Enviro-Stik pencils, and recycled paper clips.

And, the Library also goes beyond what is required.  How does RRC Library uniquely practice sustainability? By:

  • “Ever-greening” its collection; i.e. weeding to make room for new materials.  The old materials are not just thrown out to the landfill.  Far from it!  Once removed, they are made freely available for anyone to pick up from our freebie display.  Leftover items are picked up by the College’s Recycling team. 
  • Practicing responsible printing – by staff and students with a bias to “keep it green and leave it on the screen”.
  • Saving non-confidential photocopier/printer waste sheets that are blank on at least one side, for use as scrap paper by students and staff.
  • Responsible recycling or disposal of video tapes, batteries, electronic equipment, etc.
  • Inviting users to bring their own (ear)buds.   
  • Launching its recreational reading book exchange program.
  • Scrolling information on strategically placed screens for all to see instead of printing handouts.
  • Featuring green themes in its window display, such as the recent “Prepare for Spring!”
  • Creating curriculum-based, sustainability-related research guides, such as
  • Refreshing the air and milieu with plants – all provided by Library staff.
  • Undertaking a composting pilot project at its Exchange District Campus location that collected 157.5 lbs. by weight and 205 liters by volume, over one calendar year, Jan. 26/12 to Jan. 25/13.

For further information about greening libraries:

Making the grade, meeting deadlines, and other great dilemmas

March 20, 2014 • Written by

It’s a push to get to the end of the term. The stress is mounting as you face a pile of assignments and tests, accompanied by anxiety about how to get everything done and actually attain your goals for success. See below for some short videos geared toward students like you. A few small changes in how you study and handle your time can make a big difference!

VIDEO SERIES FEATURE:
Academic success: smart tips for serious students

This video series features five videos, each about 10 minutes long and divided into bite-sized segments. It’s so easy to get a little inspiration on the go! Just click on the image, go the Library web page, click the play link, and log in with your RRC username and password to view. The series is also available on DVD.

Studying and test-taking

Studying and test-taking

Studying and test-taking

Researching, reading, and writing

Researching, reading, and writing

Researching, reading, and writing

Time management

Time management

Time management

 Active listening and note-taking

Active listening and note-taking

Active listening and note-taking

 Values and goals

Values and goals

Values and goals

RRC Library is here to help you

Red River College Library staff want to help you succeed. Come by for a visit or contact us by phone or email with any questions you have to ask us.

Red River College Authors

March 5, 2014 • Written by

rrc-authors

Several Red River College Instructors, Staff, Students and Alumni have written and published books in the past.  In our current Notre Dame Campus Library window display, we proudly present some of these works.  Check it out!

Click here for a complete list of all titles/authors on display:
http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

Here is a small sample of the items currently on display:

Gift ecology : remaining a sustainable world

Gift ecology remaining a sustainable worldAuthor: Peter Denton (Red River College Instructor)
Synopsis:In this thought-provoking work, Peter Denton argues that the attitudes and values associated with the economics of exchange are in part to blame for our current situation. We need to rediscover what it means to live in a universe of relations, not merely in one that can be counted and measured. The more we are able to replace an economy based on transactions with an ecology based on gifts, the more likely a sustainable future becomes for all of Earth’s children.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=119024

Global citizen : river of love & other essays

GlobalCitizenCover250Author: Stan Chung (Red River College Staff)
Synopsis: Global Citizen came to fruition as a newspaper column in October of 2006. I chose the title because global citizenship is a seductive yet contradictory term. Some prefer the concept because it recognizes the transnational character of our problems. If our problems cross national boundaries, then surely solutions require a mobilization beyond national scope. However this transnational view of the world is problematic for the average citizen. While we know that many economic, social, and environmental issues require collaborative solutions, it remains difficult for thoughtful people to know what to do. Should we look to keep our own doorways swept clean as Goethe suggests, or go across the ocean and get busy on someone else’s doorway? To be a global citizen may sound like good thing but how exactly does one choose to behave? How do you make a difference to people who are uneducated, malnourished, victimized by patriarchy and colonialization, make destitute by desertifcation, without becoming seduced by our own colonizing tendancies? Will our actions make a difference? Or is the concept of individual action just another way in which true power and authority divert us from the truth? (From the author)

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=121153

In search of the blue lotus : a feminist counter-narrative to the dominant hegemonic disourse

blue lotusAuthor: Sandra Sukhan (Red River College Staff)
Synopsis: Many of us move from childhood to adulthood without much thought of how the events of our childhood impact our lives today. Some memories are happy; others sad or traumatic. Some we remember – childhood play days, the earthy smell of rain after a dry spell, and the feeling a new mother gets when she holds her baby; others we wish to or choose to forget – thick black smoke from riots, feelings of fear because of death threats, and the uncertainty of life in another country. In this very personal diary, Sandra, through a first-person reflexive narrative, shares some of her memories of growing up in a politically charged time of Guyana’s fight for independence in the 1960s, her immigration to Canada for an arranged marriage at the age of 16, her life as a journeyperson hairstylist, and her scholarly trajectory toward a doctoral degree. She shares her growing awareness of some of the issues that affected and impacted her life – issues such as racism, gender, democracy, freedom, class struggles, privileges, unequal power relations, resistance to colonial politics, and ultimately her own complicity in, and efforts to challenge the normative discourse of the dominant ideology.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=122601

Saults & Pollard to Pollard Banknote: a century in print

Author: Dave Williamson (Former Red River College Staff)
Synopsis: The year 2007 marks the 100th anniversary of Pollard Banknote Limited. It’s unusual for a family-owned company to last that long; it’s even more remarkable that it has grown so dramatically in the last twenty years. Beginning as a general printer called Saults & Pollard, the company has become one of the world’s largest printers of lottery tickets, supplying customers all over the globe. From its humble start in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Pollard has earned an enviable international reputation for security and integrity. Four generations of Pollards have presided over astounding growth, but, as this history shows, the company’s success was made possible by the dedication of the people who work there.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=101508

Construction estimating : professional reference

Construction estimatingAuthor: Adam Ding (Red River College Instructor)
Synopsis:The DEWALT Construction Estimating Professional Reference guide is essential in helping the professional successfully bid on construction projects. Based on real-life experience in bidding hundreds of different types of jobs, this guide walks through every step of the bidding process — from receiving a set of drawings to the post-bid review.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=108920

Finding Gloria

finding gloriaAuthor: Marianne Curtis (Red River College Graduate)
Synopsis: It tells the story of a woman given up at birth and adopted by a family who eventually settles in Southern Manitoba. Finding Gloria exposes the author’s upbringing in an abusive home where she was beaten and starved, until she runs away. As a ward of Child and Family Services, the author struggles to find herself after years of emotional and physical abuse. … Finding Gloria chronicles the authors rise out of the ashes of abject misery to the point of discovering that everything she grew up believing about herself was lies. Only she could change her future into a glori-ous life of her own choosing, whatever that may be.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=119102

From fire to flood : a history of theatre in Manitoba

Kevin LongfieldAuthor: Kevin Longfield (Red River College Instructor)
Synopsis:From Fire to Flood explores how Manitoba theatre got to where it is today, and why it didn’t go somewhere else. It examines Manitoba theatre from its beginnings, placing theatre in its social and historical context. A key question is how our theatrical past can help us complete the final piece of the puzzle: a unified, indigenous theatre that explains us to ourselves and to the rest of the world.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=86271

Sacred learning : establishing a model for Native education

Sacred learning  establishing a model for Native educationAuthor: Anita L. Keith (Red River College Instructor)
Synopsis: At present, the future of Native North American education is in crisis. many return to the mainstream educational system where they are provided with the same curriculum content that once failed them. First Nations children, like all other children, are gifted learners, and educators are beginning to recognize that the process of learning is critically important. In Sacred Learning, Anita Keith puts forth a vision to ensure that our First Nations children have access to an education characterized by excellence of instruction and appropriate academic content. It must also be provided in a safe and culturally relevant learning environment that is grounded in the traditions, teaching and holistic approach of the Native knowledge and that respects the vision of tribal communities.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=103217

Tatsea

Tatsea4Author: Armin Wiebe (Former Red River College Instructor)
Synopsis: Winner of the Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction and the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award (Manitoba Writing and Publishing Awards). Set in Canada’s Subarctic in the late 1700s, a time when the Dogrib people were under constant threat of attack by raiders supplied with European weapons. After Ikotsali saves Tatsea and her father following a huntingaccident, Tatsea is obliged to marry their strange-looking rescuer. One day when Ikotsali is away from camp, raiders arrive and kill everyone. The only lives spared are those of Tatsea, who is captured, and their infant daughter, whom she has hidden. When Ikotsali returns to find the carnage, the story of their struggle to survive and be reunited begins.

Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=86164

Freedom to Read Week

February 25, 2014 • Written by

FTRW-2014-Clipart-Horizontal-thumb

Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This year it is from February 23-March 1, 2014.

Reference: http://www.freedomtoread.ca/

Censorship in Canada

Freedom to read can never be taken for granted. Even in Canada, a free country by world standards, books and magazines are banned at the border. Schools and libraries are regularly asked to remove books and magazines from their shelves. Free expression on the Internet is under attack. Few of these stories make headlines, but they affect the right of Canadians to decide for themselves what they choose to read.

Would you like to see a list of the works that have been challenged in Canada
http://www.freedomtoread.ca/challenged-works/

Freedom to Read Week Video

This inspiring Freedom to Read Week video was made by Julia and Danika from the Calgary Science School, who won the Calgary Public Library Teen Freedom to Read Week Video contest.

Items in our Collection

You too can learn more about censorship by searching our library catalogue.  Here are a few items that the Red River College Library currently has in it’s collection:

120 banned books : censorship histories of world literature
Throughout history, nations, peoples, and governments have censored writers and their works on political, religious, sexual, and social grounds. Although the literary merit of the majority of these books has been proven time and time again, efforts are still in place today to suppress some of them. From Animal Farm to Ulysses, this book examines the struggle 120 of these works faced to be read.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=95189

Dear sir, I intend to burn your book : an anatomy of a book burning
In 2011, Canadian writer Lawrence Hill received an email from a man in the Netherlands stating that he intended to burn The Book of Negroes, Hill’s internationally acclaimed novel. Soon, the threat was international news, affecting Hill’s publishers and readers. In this provocative essay, Hill shares his private response to that moment and the controversy that followed, examing his reaction to the threat, while attempting to come to terms with the book burner’s motives and complaints.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=121454

forbiddenfruitForbidden fruit : banned, censored, and challenged books from Dante to Harry Potter
From the New Testament to The Diary of Anne Frank to current objections to the Harry Potter series–dubbed the most frequently challenged books of the 21st century by the American Library Association–the tradition of banning, censoring, and challenging books has been remarkably enduring.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=112230

Literature suppressed on political grounds
Throughout history, tyrants, totalitarian states, religious institutions, and democratic governments alike have banned books thought to challenge their beliefs or question their activities. This book profiles the censorship of works banned because they were perceived as threats to governmental security or challenges to widely held political values, or simply because they presented truths embarassing to authorities.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=99785

Freedom To Read Week Display

At our downtown campus, at the John and Bonnie Buhler Library in the Roblin Centre, there is a Freedom to Read Week display, which includes many more related items from our collection.

Video Feature: National Film Board

February 21, 2014 • Written by

National Film Board of CanadaAs Canada’s public film producer and distributor, the National Film Board (NFB) is considered an essential part of Canada’s cultural heritage. Founded in 1939, they produce world-renowned films that are recognized for their distinctive, relevant and innovative qualities.

The NFB film collection comprises documentaries, animations, experimental films and fiction. They showcase films that take a stand on global issues of concern to Canadians—environmental issues, human rights issues, international conflict, the arts, etc. The NFB has produced over 13,000 productions and have won over 5,000 awards, including 6 Webbys, 12 Oscars, and over 90 Genies. (Sources: National Film Board of CanadaWelcome to NFB.ca)

For more info on the NFB, check them out at the National Film Board website.

NFB Films at RRC Library

RRC Library holds nearly 225 films by the NFB. These are valued for their enduring educational value and Canadian focus. Here is a taste of some streamed titles that we offer (click the images to log in and view).

Grievance

Grievance

Illustrates the orderly processing of a grievance through several stages of negotiation between union and management, showing how the rights of a worker with a genuine grievance are protected under the union’s contract. (1954, 29 min.)

Out: stories of lesbian and gay youth

Out

An intimate exploration of the struggles and victories of gay and lesbian youth in Canada. Delving into the emotional, societal and familial conflicts lesbian and gay youth often face, this film breaks the damaging silence surrounding sexual orientation and sexual differences. (1994, 40 min.)

Justice denied

Justice denied

Donald Marshall, a Micmac Indian, was only 17 when he was sentenced to life imprisonment for a murder he did not commit. He spent 11 years in a maximum security prison until the real murderer was discovered. Based on the true story of this tragic and controversial case as recorded in the best-selling book by Michael. (1989, 98 min.)

 A house divided: caregiver stress and elder abuse

House dividedThrough four moving portraits, A House Divided sheds light on the tragedy of caregiver stress and elder abuse. With great sensitivity, this film portrays the emotional complexity of family relationships that can lead to abuse of the elderly, the anguish and isolation of its victims, and the tremendous need for community understanding and support.
(1988, 35 min.)

 

If you have any questions, please contact Media Services at Red River College Library:

  • Notre Dame Campus Library: media@rrc.ca or 204-632-2231
  • Exchange District Campus Library: pscmedia@rrc.ca or 204-949-8370