International Women’s Day 2018 #PressforProgress

March 6, 2018 • Written by

International Women’s Day is coming. Let’s get ready. March 8, 2018


With the World Economic Forum’s 2017 Global Gender Gap Report findings telling us that gender parity is over 200 years away – there has never been a more important time to keep motivated and #PressforProgress. And with global activism for women’s equality fuelled by movements like #MeToo, #TimesUp and more – there is a strong global momentum striving for gender parity.

And while we know that gender parity won’t happen overnight, the good news is that across the world women are making positive gains day by day. Plus, there’s indeed a very strong and growing global movement of advocacy, activism and support.

So we can’t be complacent. Now, more than ever, there’s a strong call-to-action to press forward and progress gender parity. A strong call to #PressforProgress. A strong call to motivate and unite friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.

International Women’s Day is not country, group or organisation specific. The day belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. So together, let’s all be tenacious in accelerating gender parity. Collectively, let’s all Press for Progress.



RRC Library Resources

The Red River College Library maintains items related to “Gender Equality” and “Gender Parity” in our collection; patrons are encouraged to search our online catalogue for resources. In addition, please check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed related resources.

You may view a list of items in our window display here:

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.


Lean in : women, work, and the will to lead

Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In this book the author examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential. She is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune magazine’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers.


Canadian women and the struggle for equality since 1867

The lives of girls and women have seen an astounding degree of transformation over the last 150 years. At the time of Confederation, females were not considered persons, legally or in many respects even socially. Today, while there is still a considerable distance to go, the opportunities available to women have grown exponentially. Lorna R. Marsden-sociologist, past Canadian senator, and activist-explores social change in Canada’s unique setting. The stories of how women seized opportunities to advance their status are both surprising and compelling, and reveal as much about Canada as a country as they do about the long road toward equality that women have travelled. Chapters provide absorbing insights into how change takes place over a range of topics, including the law, demographics, work, and social institutions; substantial advancement also took place in the wake of two world wars. Book jacket.


About Canada: Women’s rights

About Canada : women’s rights introduces readers to some of the many women who changed Canada through their efforts to secure greater equality. While a few are well known, many of these women and the battles they won have been forgotten. They deserve a greater place in Canada’s history.



Women and business since 1500 : invisible presences in Europe and North America?

This volume surveys the role women have played in various types of business as owners, co-owners and decision-making managers in European and North American societies since the sixteenth century. Drawing on up-to-date scholarship, it identifies the economic, social, legal and cultural factors that have facilitated or restricted women’s participation in business. It pays particular attention to the ways in which gender norms, and their evolution, shaped not only those women’s experience of business, but the ways they were perceived by contemporaries, documented in sources and, partly as a consequence, viewed by historians.


Making space for Indigenous feminism

The 2007 first edition of this book proposed that Indigenous feminism was a valid and indeed essential theoretical and activist position, and introduced a roster of important Indigenous feminist contributors. The book has been well received nationally and internationally. It has been deployed in Indigenous Studies, Law, Political Science, and Women and Gender Studies in universities and appears on a number of doctoral comprehensive exam reading lists. The second edition, Making More Space, builds on the success of its predecessor, but is not merely a reiteration of it. Some chapters from the first edition are largely revised. A majority of the chapters are new, written for the second edition by important new scholars and activists. The second edition is more confident and less diffident about making the case for Indigenous feminism and in deploying a feminist analysis. The chapters cover issues that are relevant to some of the most important issues facing Indigenous people–violence against women, recovery of Indigenous self-determination, racism, misogyny, and decolonisation. Specifically, new chapters deal with Indigenous resurgence, feminism amongst the Sami and in Aboriginal Australia, neoliberal restructuring in Oaxaca, Canada’s settler racism and sexism, and missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

International Women’s Day: Videos Now on Display

March 5, 2018 • Written by

Thursday, March 8, 2018 is International Women’s Day, an annual event celebrating women’s achievements and promoting gender equality.

AV Services, NDC Library, has put together a collection of videos that deal with a range of issues related to women. These videos are freely available to all staff and students at RRC. Come check out the display outside AV Services, or view some of our online selections below.

Available Online (log in required):

Gender Matters: A Virtual Discussion on Violence Against Women

As part of the Young Women’s National Leadership Summit, the YWCA and the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) invited participants aged 17+ from across North America to take part in a conversation with three outstanding role models and leaders in the fight for women’s rights. Focusing on the subject of gender-based violence, the panellists discussed the issues that women are facing today, and how we can work together to create a fairer and safer society for all. (2017 | 48 min)



The War at Home

Across Canada, a woman is killed every six days by her intimate partner. Another 3,000 flee their homes each night, seeking refuge in shelters. This must-see documentary offers an intimate look at a private battlefield, one where thousands of Canadian women live in fear in the one place they should feel safe – their homes. Warning: this program may contain mature subject matter and coarse language. Viewer discretion is advised. (2016 | 44 min)

Questions or suggestions?

If you have any questions about AV materials, or you are an instructor and would like to suggest a purchase, please contact AV Services:

Notre Dame Campus

Phone: 204-632-2231

Exchange District Campus

Phone: 204-949-8370


3 Ways to Stand Out at the Career Fair

January 17, 2018 • Written by

Getting ready for this year’s Career Fair (January 24 & 25, 2018) may seem like a daunting task. However, it doesn’t have to be. A few simple strategies can help open the door to new and exciting career opportunities. Below are some selected resources and tips to help you stand out to potential employers. (Note: log in is required to view electronic resources)

1. Boost Your Resume

Your resume is one of your most important assets, and it is wise to have an up-to-date version on hand. If you are starting from scratch, have a look at Same-day Resume: Write an Effective Resume in an Hour, which explains how to write a simple resume in about an hour (see Chapter 2). For examples of career-based resumes, check out Part 2 of Gallery of Best Resumes: A Collection of Quality Resumes by Professional Resume Writers. Also, Knock Em Dead Resumes: A Killer Resume Gets More Job Interviews includes easy-to-follow tips for giving your resume a boost.

2. Practice Promoting Yourself

Be prepared to promote yourself. First impressions have a powerful impact, and are set in “the first 10-30 seconds of meeting someone. Psychologists call this the Primacy Effect, and it is very hard to erase.” (From The Six Laws of Approachability: How to Break Down Barriers and Get People to Like You.) Laura Stack, in Self-promotion and Self-presentation Skills: Marketing Yourself for Success suggests practicing “doing a commercial for yourself. It should be 15-30 seconds, not long, just something that you have down pat for when someone asks you, “So, what do you do?“”

3. Dress for Success

What you wear matters a lot because it is the first thing people see about you, and first impressions are essential to standing out. “And your clothes say a lot about your judgment and level of professionalism—two extremely important criteria.” (From This Is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want – p. 182).

Video: Learn how to enhance your overall image >> When Presentation Counts: Grooming, Dressing & Body Language

Watch “Career Fair Prep” – Thurs, Jan 18 at 12:00

Strategies and Tips Career Fair Prep – Live Stream: Thursday, January 18 at 12:00 pm. Find out how to prepare for and what to expect at the RRC 2018 Career Fair on January 24 (NDC) and January 25 (EDC). Learn how to plan a strategy for the most effective and efficient use of your time, how to approach employers with an introduction that makes a good impression, and how to follow-up after the fair.

Canada’s Day of Remembrance – Learn more with streaming video

November 9, 2017 • Written by

As Remembrance Day approaches, we present a selection of video titles chosen from our collection. Please take the time to learn more about why we remember through these streaming videos from our partners, the National Film Board of Canada and CBC Curio.

Note: All videos require Red River College student/staff login.

John McCrae’s War: In Flanders Fields

John McCrae's War: In Flanders Fields

This feature documentary profiles poet John McCrae, from his childhood in Ontario to his years in medicine at McGill University and the WWI battlefields of Belgium, where he cared for wounded soldiers. Generations of schoolchildren have recited McCrae’s iconic poem “In Flanders Fields,” but McCrae and Alexis Helmer—the young man whose death inspired the poem—have faded from memory. This film seeks to revive their stories through a vivid portrait of a great man in Canadian history.

A War Story

A War Story

Based on the diaries of Canadian doctor Ben Wheeler during his internment in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp during World War II, this feature-length docudrama is a glowing account of the spirit and its will to survive physical and mental suffering. The film is comprised of newsreel footage, interviews and dramatic re-enactments.


Liberation of Holland

In 1944, Canadian soldiers of the First Hussars Regiment began their battle through Nazi-occupied Europe. They forged ahead into Holland to end the war in 1945. Seventy years later, we join serving soldiers & veterans as they visit the Netherlands on a pilgrimage – to understand what liberation truly means.

Fields of Sacrifice

This 1964 documentary returns to the battlefields where over 100,000 Canadian soldiers lost their lives in the First and Second World Wars. The film also visits cemeteries where servicemen are buried. Filmed from Hong Kong to Sicily, this documentary is designed to show Canadians places they have reason to know but may not be able to visit. Produced for the Canadian Department of Veteran Affairs by the renowned documentary filmmaker Donald Brittain.


PTSD: Beyond Trauma

The image of the tormented veteran unable to transition from war zone to home front is well-known. But the focus on the military’s struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) obscures a simple reality: PTSD hits more civilians than soldiers, and more women than men. But when so many people experience sudden loss, near-death, violence and abuse, why are only some haunted by PTSD while others are more resilient? Promising new discoveries raise key questions about the faultlines of fear and memory, and the roles geography and early development may play in predicting personal responses to trauma.


Broken Heroes

Every Remembrance Day, we honour the sacrifices made by those who were killed or physically injured serving their country in wartime. But, what of those with the crippling but invisible wounds of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? In this Fifth Estate documentary, Gillian Findlay introduces us to three Canadian soldiers who served in Afghanistan. Jeff, Matt and Dave all speak candidly about the flashbacks hurtling them back to the war zone, grief for dead comrades, their ongoing battles with addiction, even suicide attempts. Also featured is General Romeo Dallaire, well known for his very public battle with PTSD after witnessing genocide in Rwanda. Using the military’s own arguably conservative estimate, as many as 2,000 soldiers returning from Afghanistan could experience PTSD. The urgency to find a treatment has never been greater.


Ordeal by Fire

ordeal by fire

Canada’s heavy military role in World War I (60,000 dead in a population of eight million) transforms its society, its politics and its place in the world. The horror, bravery and sacrifice of trench warfare are evoked in Canada’s great battles: Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Courcelette and Passchendaele. The domestic consequences of Canada’s war effort are also wrenching – the conscription crisis of 1917 marks a low point in English-French relations. After the war ends, labour revolts in Winnipeg and across the country raise fears of a Bolshevik insurrection. The return to stability in the mid-1920s lasts only briefly, as the crash of 1929 plunges the country into economic chaos.


Video Resources to Help You Thrive

November 6, 2017 • Written by

In honour of THRIVE WEEK, AV Services (NDC) has curated a selection of video resources to help you thrive.

Thrive Week at RRC

Image source:

Laugh Away Your Stress with Richard Condie

One of the best known remedies for stress is laughter. Richard Condie’s award-winning animations are sure to do the trick. These films are available through the Library’s subscription to (RRC network log in required).

Animation by Richard Condie on

THE BIG SNIT (9 min) This poignant and hilarious animated film perfectly captures the intersection of a domestic quarrel and a global nuclear war.

PIGBIRD (3 min) This animated short tells the zany story of a cagey citizen’s success at getting a forbidden “animal” through customs and the disastrous results that follow.

OH SURE (1 min)  Here is a lesson in how to make a fool of oneself easily and effectively. Two gentlemen are involved: one who wishes to read his newspaper and another who insists on performing acrobatic feats.

THE APPRENTICE (9 min) In this animated short, an old fool meets a young fool at a crossroads. The young fool skips blindly down the wrong road, and the old fool must then teach his young apprentice about the consequences.

JOHN LAW and the MISSISSIPPI BUBBLE (9 min) This animated short offers up a history lesson about one of the most sensational get-rich-quick schemes that took place in France over 200 years ago.

GETTING STARTED (12 min) This hilarious short animated film stars a man who procrastinates. Our hero attempts to practice a piece of music on the piano, but distractions get in the way. When he finally sits down to play, pandemonium breaks loose.

LA SALLA (8 min) In this animated short, the classic tale of temptation is revealed in the form of a comic opera. In a room full of wind-up toys, our hero sets a chain of events into motion that ends up disturbing both his own, and the viewer’s, sense of reality.

Videos on Display at NDC Library, AV Services

BEHIND THE MASK Anxiety levels among teens have increased by more than 30 percent in the last decade. The stories told in the video offer a perspective on how to manage the pressure and anxiety in life.

BRAIN GAINS: BETTER GRADES THROUGH FITNESS The National visits an inner city high school in Saskatoon, SK, where one teacher went out on a limb to test the theory that vigorous daily exercise improves academic performance. Also available online.

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM: YOU’VE GOT THE POWER Good self-esteem gives you the power to deal with changes, pressures and influences in your life. A positive self image also means healthier relationships and better success in school or on the job. Viewers will learn 9 steps to building self-esteem.

EXPRESSION AND HEALING THROUGH ART The Seekers explore what arts and culture mean to them and all Aboriginal people. Regardless of the medium, art has the power to heal us socially, physically, mentally, and spiritually.

GOOD NIGHT: WITH THE SLEEP DOCTOR Dr. Michael Breus explains how genes, environment, job habits, and physiology may hamper sleep and thus dramatically affect waking life. He shows that getting proper quality and quantity of sleep can help rejuvenate the mind and body, improve sex life, increase energy, and help a person lose weight and look younger.

HAPPINESS Go on a journey of joy! Learn how contentment contributes to obesity and yet, is the one sentiment that motivates us to live. Discover the results of a World Happiness Report, which offers insight into the age-old question: are poor people happier than rich ones? Behavioural experts explain how we can be trained to experience happiness. Also available online.

PREVENTING AND MANAGING STRESS Learn from experts about the causes of stress and how to lessen its negative impacts.

SLEEPLESS EPIDEMIC: PRACTICAL STEPS TO HELP ADOLESCENTS GET THE SLEEP THEY NEED This program, hosted by Sleepless in America author Mary Sheedy Kurcinka, Ed. D, helps teens identify sleep deprivation and understand its risks while providing strategies for getting more sleep.

STRESS: PORTRAIT OF A KILLER Stanford University neurobiologist, Robert Sapolsky, has been advancing our understanding of stress – how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. Understanding how stress works can help us figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. Also available online.

TIME MANAGEMENT Over the course of this three-section program, viewers will learn to side-step common time-management errors and plan out their semesters so they can take control of their time and enjoy a healthy work/life balance.

UNSTRESS FOR SUCCESS  A little bit of stress has positive effect… high levels of continued stress is quite harmful. Discusses the implications of stress on health and disease. Provides hilarious ways to reduce stress in your daily routine. Also available online.

VALUES AND GOALS This three-section program combines commentary from educators and students with in-class exercise segments to explore the meaning of values and goals and illustrate how they steer and shape a person’s life–in college and beyond.

WIRED DIFFERENTLY Current studies show that approximately 20 percent of all students suffer from a mental, emotional or behavioral health issue. The insights in this 15 minute video will help you and your staff adopt these five keys to working with students with mental wellness challenges.

Need Assistance?

For assistance with the Library’s video resources, please contact AV Services at 204-632-2231 or

Norman Beattie, one of the College’s longest serving staff, to retire

October 30, 2017 • Written by
Norman Beattie

Norman Beattie, one of the College’s longest serving staff is retiring from his position as Coordinator, Reference and Public Services effective October 31, 2017.

Norman Beattie, one of the College’s longest serving staff is retiring from his position as Coordinator, Reference and Public Services effective October 31, 2017.

Norman joined the College in 1981 as Reference Librarian and also served as Acting Director from 2015 to the summer of 2017. During Norman’s years of service the Library’s services have transformed from a paper based catalogue and collection to a predominately electronically accessible world of information. Throughout all the technological changes Norman has maintained the highest level of service to innumerable students and staff over the years. From serving as a reference librarian at the information desk to instructing groups of students in research methods, Norman has shared his wealth of knowledge and experience with tens of thousands of learners.

We wish Norman a well-deserved retirement!

Breast Cancer Awareness: Video Resources

October 12, 2017 • Written by

Breast Cancer Awareness

Breast cancer has been identified as one of the most common types of cancer in Canada. Your awareness of prevention methods, risk factors and screening techniques can influence the survival of you and/or your loved ones. Here are a few quick facts to consider:

“It is estimated that about 1 in 8 Canadian women will develop breast cancer during her lifetime and 1 in 31 will die from it.” (Source: Canadian Cancer Society)

“Breast cancer prevention starts with healthy habits — such as limiting alcohol and staying physically active.” (Source: Mayo Clinic)

“Being breast healthy means being breast aware; knowing about breast cancer risk factors; understanding your personal risk of breast cancer; proactive ways to help reduce your breast cancer risk; and being informed about screening for the earlier detection of breast cancer.” (Source: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation)

Videos for Breast Cancer Awareness

In honour of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we have the following videos on display outside Media Services at NDC Library. They are available to all staff and students at the College (online resources will require your RRC log in information).

At My Mother’s Breast
Heather is 27 years old, and the daughter of a woman with breast cancer, who is the daughter of a woman with breast cancer, who is the daughter of a woman with breast cancer. She grew up waiting for her mom to get sick and wondering when she would follow. In this video, Heather illustrates how this illness changes mothers and daughters and how they come out forever changed. Also available in streaming format.

Autopsy Life & Death: Tumors
Anatomist Gunther von Hagens and pathologist John Lee expose cancer for what it is–an attacker that can quickly and stealthily infiltrate the human body. Also available in streaming format.

Big C: Pathophysiology of Cancer
Provides an update and overview on the pathophysiology of cancer. Specific cancers to be discussed include breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, hematologic malignancies, brain tumors and GI cancers. Also available in streaming format.

Cancer Story: Prevention and Screening
Highlights prevention models that have led to reductions in the incidence of cancer by behaviorial changes, such as smoking cessation and/or weight loss, and medical procedures.

Cancer Story: What is Cancer?
Presents a basic explanation of how normal cells behave and cancer cells begin. This is illustrated by following a hypothetical cancer patient through diagnosis and treatment.

Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies
Presents a history of cancer, from ancient times to the present day. Includes stories of contemporary patients and examines the latest scientific research which might indicate that we are on the brink of a lasting cure.

Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Examines side effects of cancer treatments and  suggests ways to combat these effects and feel better despite the likelihood of pain, nausea and other debilitations. Also available in streaming format.

Estrogen: Friend or Foe
Estrogen, the “female” hormone, has over 300 functions in practically all body tissues. In this presentation, Barb discusses the myriad of functions and correlates them with clinical examples. She also discusses the role of estrogen in breast cancer and other diseases that commonly afflict women. Also available in streaming format.

Pink Ribbons (online resource)
A feature documentary that shows how the devastating reality of breast cancer, which marketing experts have labeled a “dream cause,” has been hijacked by a shiny, pink story of success.

Run Your Own Race
Dr. Marla Shapiro, host of CTV’s daytime series Balance: Television for Living Well and medical consultant for CTV News, tells her private story, from diagnosis to recovery. This one-hour special aired on CTV to coincide with Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October of 2005.

Thunder Blanket (online resource)
A 5-part series that explores a young Aboriginal woman’s battle against breast cancer and the complexity of being a traditionalist searching for a cure in a modern world.

Uncovering the Social Determinants of Health
Health disparities between various populations are a critical social justice issue. To illustrate mechanisms of disparity, Dr. Buki uses breast cancer in Latina women as a model to demonstrate the psychosocial, cultural, and institutional factors that combine to produce lower survivorship rates.

An English professor, who alienates her students, has always had control over her life. That is until she is diagnosed with a devastating illness. She agrees to undergo a series of procedures that are brutal, extensive and experimental. She finds that the fine line between life and death can only be walked with wit.

Questions or recommendations?

If you have questions, or you are an instructor and would like to recommend a purchase, please contact  AV Services at NDC:

  • Phone: 204-632-2231
  • Email:

Videos for Mental Illness Awareness #MIAW17

October 4, 2017 • Written by

Mental HealthGoal of MIAW: Reduce Stigma and Increase Awareness

One in five Canadians will experience a mental health problem or illness in a given year. Many such victims face the reality that misconceptions about mental illness abound. Reducing stigma and increasing awareness of mental illness is the main purpose of Mental Illness Awareness Week (October 1-7, 2017). Check out the videos below for real stories of tragedy and triumph as sufferers (and the professionals who treat them) speak out and share their stories. RRC Library video resources are available to all staff and students at the College.

Learn more about MIAW >> Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW)

Videos for Mental Illness Awareness

In honour of MIAW, the following videos are on display outside Media Services, NDC Library.

Available on DVD

Anxiety Disorders: An Overview An overview of anxiety disorders — panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, specific phobias, and obsessive compulsive disorder — provided by the Anxiety Disorders Association of Manitoba (ADAM).

Beyond the Blues: Child and Youth Depression Through the personal stories of three young people, this compelling documentary traces the journey of depression, from early signs and symptoms, to assessment, diagnosis and treatment. Also available in streaming format.

Darkness in the Afternoon A story seen through the eyes of Marie, who has dementia, and her inner reality of seeing her husband as a threatening stranger.

Depression: a Cognitive Therapy Approach Demonstrates critical interventions in a representative course of cognitive therapy with a patient who meets diagnostic criteria for major depression as well as dysthymia.

Drummer Boy Things go terribly wrong for 18 year old Philip Renold. He drops out of school to sort it all out, but matters only get worse, until it seems there is only one thing he can do to save his life and his sanity.

Flight from Darkness Focuses on the life of Percy Paul, from his dazzling rise and fall as a brilliant mathematician to his continuing struggle to prevail over his illness and realize his full potential.

Going to Extremes Looks at two major categories of mood disorders–depression and bipolar disorder–and at the cluster of psychoses known as schizophrenia.

Louis Theroux: Extreme Love: Dementia Louis Theroux spends time with America’s growing population of dementia sufferers and carers seeing how families maintain relationships with their loved ones even as the building blocks of personality and character are eroded by this illness.

Mixed Anxiety and Depression: a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach Internationally renowned therapist Donald Meichenbaum demonstrates a brief, effective approach for treating anxiety and depression.

My Name is Walter James Cross This compelling dramatic monologue presents an accurate depiction of the devastating, costly, much maligned, and misunderstood illness called schizophrenia.

Preventing and Managing Stress Learn from experts about the causes of stress and how to lessen its negative impacts.

Racing Thoughts A film about children who live with mental illness and their loved ones who make the courageous decision to open up about their stories.

Not Just a Bad Day: Living With Bipolar Disorder Profiles four individuals who live under the shadow of bipolar disorder – one of the most commonly misunderstood and misdiagnosed mental illnesses.

Scared Stiff: Fast, Effective Treatment for Anxiety Disorders Dr. David Burns will illustrate how to integrate all three models (Cognitive, Behavioral, Hidden Emotional) in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

Speaking from Experience: Families and Mental Illness This guide is intended to help family, friends, and other carers of people who have been seriously affected by mental illness.

Teens at Risk: Suicidal Signs Raising teenagers with mental health issues can be a difficult and very challenging experience. Parents and teenagers tell their stories of struggle as they learn how some families cope with parenting a mentally ill teen.

These Forgotten Voices: A Choir that Defies Prejudice The fifteen singers featured in this concert all have mental health problems. Witness an amazing change as the participants evolve from their difficult first singing lessons to their highly successful concert.

This Beggar’s Description He as been locked up in jails and psych wards, kicked out of the house, and spent long periods living on the streets of Montréal. This is the story of Phil Tétrault and the far-reaching effects of schizophrenia.

Voices of Resiliency: Hearing, Sharing, Learning with Each Other Compiled from the 2006 Voices of Resiliency Conference hosted by the Manitoba Schizophrenia Society. Features thought-provoking discussions that capture the stories of recovery of individuals living with schizophrenia and depression.

Whisper: Coping With Suicide in Aboriginal Communities Aimed at community workers, this video addresses the prevalence of suicide in Canada’s Aboriginal communities.

Work and Recovery: Stories of Employment and Mental Health Introduces five people assisted by employment services that support evidence-based practices. Their stories remind us how important work can be to a person’s recovery journey.

Available through our online collection (log in required)

Being Greene ( This Firsthand documentary takes an intimate look at one family’s struggle to break free from the clutches of mental illness.

Age of Anxiety ( Anxiety. It’s being called the disease of the 21st century.  Age of Anxiety examines what anxiety is, and how and why it is being re-defined by the medical and pharmaceutical industries.

Pinel: A glimpse into the suffering of mental illness ( Pinel tells the story of three men who committed a violent crime while experiencing psychosis. They were found not criminally responsible by reason of mental disorder and hospitalized at Pinel, a maximum-security institution specializing in the treatment of violent behavior linked to mental illness.

Stigma ( This film tells the story of a young woman who suffers a mental breakdown, recovers fully in a mental hospital and returns home. Instead of the understanding and support she most needs from her friends and associates, she is virtually ostracized. The film makes a plea for a change in the sort of public thinking that places a stigma upon people who have suffered from an illness of the mind rather than of the body.

OCD: The War Inside ( This feature documentary explores the daily lives of individuals living with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), a misunderstood anxiety disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts, nagging fears and ritualistic behaviour. From the outside, its sufferers have no physical disabilities and have every appearance of being as functional as the next person. But inside, a daily war is waged for survival.

If you have questions, or are an instructor who would like to suggest a purchase, please contact AV Services, NDC:
  • Phone: 204-632-2231
  • Email:

Mental Illness Awareness Week

October 3, 2017 • Written by

Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) is an annual national public education campaign designed to help open the eyes of Canadians to the reality of mental illness. The week was established in 1992 by the Canadian Psychiatric Association, and is now coordinated by the Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH) in cooperation with all its member organizations and many other supporters across Canada.

One of MIAW’s major initiatives is the Faces of Mental Illness campaign, a national outreach campaign featuring the stories of Canadians living in recovery from mental illness. Thousands of pieces of MIAW posters, brochures, and bookmarks featuring the Faces are disseminated to hundreds of organizations across Canada in an effort to raise awareness and end the stigma associated with mental illness.

Learn More:

Notre Dame Campus Window Display

Check out the Notre Dame Campus Library window display, which highlights books and materials chosen to help you to learn more about this issue. To view a list of books in the window display click here or view some of the items below.

Living recovery : youth speak out on “owning” mental illness

Living Recovery provides critical information for practitioners and educators in mental health services about the self-described needs of young people diagnosed with mental illness. It portrays the stages of living with mental illness through the recovery model ELAR-emergence, loss, adaptation, and recovery.



Beyond schizophrenia : living and working with a serious mental illness

If someone you know is living and working with schizophrenia, their life is often fraught with challenges and setbacks. Baldwin makes a comprehensive attempt to explain why, in spite of near-miraculous advances in medication and treatment, persons with mental illness fare worse than almost any other disadvantaged group in the labor market. She looks at societal factors that affect employment outcomes for persons with serious mental illness, and then examines workplace factors that affect employment outcomes, including employer mandates in the Americans with Disabilities Act. Baldwin also outlines a set of policy recommendations designed to improve employment outcomes for this population.


I am not sick, I don’t need help! : how to help someone with mental illness accept treatment

I Am Not Sick, I Don’t Need Help! is not just a reference for mental health practitioners or law enforcement professionals. It is a must-read guide for family members whose loved ones are battling mental illness. Read and learn as have hundreds of thousands of others…to Leap -Listen, Empathize, Agree, and Partner-and help your patients and loved ones accept the treatment they need.


What is mental illness?

According to a major health survey, nearly half of all Americans have been mentally ill at some point in their lives—more than a quarter in the last year. Can this be true? What exactly does it mean, anyway? What’s a disorder, and what’s just a struggle with real life? This lucid and incisive book cuts through both professional jargon and polemical hot air, to describe the intense political and intellectual struggles over what counts as a “real” disorder, and what goes into the “DSM,” the psychiatric bible. Is schizophrenia a disorder? Absolutely. Is homosexuality? It was—until gay rights activists drove it out of the DSM a generation ago. What about new and controversial diagnoses? Is “social anxiety disorder” a way of saying that it’s sick to be shy, or “female sexual arousal disorder” that it’s sick to be tired? An advisor to the DSM, but also a fierce critic of exaggerated overuse, Richard J. McNally defends the careful approach of describing disorders by patterns of symptoms that can be seen, and illustrates how often the system medicalizes everyday emotional life.

2nd Annual Mini-Golf Event: Photo Highlights

June 8, 2017 • Written by

Here are some photo highlights of our 2nd annual mini-golf tournament at Red River College Library, Notre Dame Campus. A big thank-you goes to Bettina Allen for planning the event and to all of the Library staff who volunteered to make it happen. It was great to see RRC staff and students having so much fun in the Library!



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