Posts by Linda Fox

Video Resources to Help You Thrive

November 6, 2017 • Written by

In honour of THRIVE WEEK, AV Services (NDC) has curated a selection of video resources to help you thrive.

Thrive Week at RRC

Image source: pixabay.com

Laugh Away Your Stress with Richard Condie

One of the best known remedies for stress is laughter. Richard Condie’s award-winning animations are sure to do the trick. These films are available through the Library’s subscription to NFB.ca (RRC network log in required).

Animation by Richard Condie on NFB.ca

THE BIG SNIT (9 min) This poignant and hilarious animated film perfectly captures the intersection of a domestic quarrel and a global nuclear war.

PIGBIRD (3 min) This animated short tells the zany story of a cagey citizen’s success at getting a forbidden “animal” through customs and the disastrous results that follow.

OH SURE (1 min)  Here is a lesson in how to make a fool of oneself easily and effectively. Two gentlemen are involved: one who wishes to read his newspaper and another who insists on performing acrobatic feats.

THE APPRENTICE (9 min) In this animated short, an old fool meets a young fool at a crossroads. The young fool skips blindly down the wrong road, and the old fool must then teach his young apprentice about the consequences.

JOHN LAW and the MISSISSIPPI BUBBLE (9 min) This animated short offers up a history lesson about one of the most sensational get-rich-quick schemes that took place in France over 200 years ago.

GETTING STARTED (12 min) This hilarious short animated film stars a man who procrastinates. Our hero attempts to practice a piece of music on the piano, but distractions get in the way. When he finally sits down to play, pandemonium breaks loose.

LA SALLA (8 min) In this animated short, the classic tale of temptation is revealed in the form of a comic opera. In a room full of wind-up toys, our hero sets a chain of events into motion that ends up disturbing both his own, and the viewer’s, sense of reality.

Videos on Display at NDC Library, AV Services

BEHIND THE MASK Anxiety levels among teens have increased by more than 30 percent in the last decade. The stories told in the video offer a perspective on how to manage the pressure and anxiety in life.

BRAIN GAINS: BETTER GRADES THROUGH FITNESS The National visits an inner city high school in Saskatoon, SK, where one teacher went out on a limb to test the theory that vigorous daily exercise improves academic performance. Also available online.

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM: YOU’VE GOT THE POWER Good self-esteem gives you the power to deal with changes, pressures and influences in your life. A positive self image also means healthier relationships and better success in school or on the job. Viewers will learn 9 steps to building self-esteem.

EXPRESSION AND HEALING THROUGH ART The Seekers explore what arts and culture mean to them and all Aboriginal people. Regardless of the medium, art has the power to heal us socially, physically, mentally, and spiritually.

GOOD NIGHT: WITH THE SLEEP DOCTOR Dr. Michael Breus explains how genes, environment, job habits, and physiology may hamper sleep and thus dramatically affect waking life. He shows that getting proper quality and quantity of sleep can help rejuvenate the mind and body, improve sex life, increase energy, and help a person lose weight and look younger.

HAPPINESS Go on a journey of joy! Learn how contentment contributes to obesity and yet, is the one sentiment that motivates us to live. Discover the results of a World Happiness Report, which offers insight into the age-old question: are poor people happier than rich ones? Behavioural experts explain how we can be trained to experience happiness. Also available online.

PREVENTING AND MANAGING STRESS Learn from experts about the causes of stress and how to lessen its negative impacts.

SLEEPLESS EPIDEMIC: PRACTICAL STEPS TO HELP ADOLESCENTS GET THE SLEEP THEY NEED This program, hosted by Sleepless in America author Mary Sheedy Kurcinka, Ed. D, helps teens identify sleep deprivation and understand its risks while providing strategies for getting more sleep.

STRESS: PORTRAIT OF A KILLER Stanford University neurobiologist, Robert Sapolsky, has been advancing our understanding of stress – how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. Understanding how stress works can help us figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. Also available online.

TIME MANAGEMENT Over the course of this three-section program, viewers will learn to side-step common time-management errors and plan out their semesters so they can take control of their time and enjoy a healthy work/life balance.

UNSTRESS FOR SUCCESS  A little bit of stress has positive effect… high levels of continued stress is quite harmful. Discusses the implications of stress on health and disease. Provides hilarious ways to reduce stress in your daily routine. Also available online.

VALUES AND GOALS This three-section program combines commentary from educators and students with in-class exercise segments to explore the meaning of values and goals and illustrate how they steer and shape a person’s life–in college and beyond.

WIRED DIFFERENTLY Current studies show that approximately 20 percent of all students suffer from a mental, emotional or behavioral health issue. The insights in this 15 minute video will help you and your staff adopt these five keys to working with students with mental wellness challenges.

Need Assistance?

For assistance with the Library’s video resources, please contact AV Services at 204-632-2231 or media@rrc.ca.

Breast Cancer Awareness: Video Resources

October 12, 2017 • Written by

Breast Cancer Awareness

Breast cancer has been identified as one of the most common types of cancer in Canada. Your awareness of prevention methods, risk factors and screening techniques can influence the survival of you and/or your loved ones. Here are a few quick facts to consider:

“It is estimated that about 1 in 8 Canadian women will develop breast cancer during her lifetime and 1 in 31 will die from it.” (Source: Canadian Cancer Society)

“Breast cancer prevention starts with healthy habits — such as limiting alcohol and staying physically active.” (Source: Mayo Clinic)

“Being breast healthy means being breast aware; knowing about breast cancer risk factors; understanding your personal risk of breast cancer; proactive ways to help reduce your breast cancer risk; and being informed about screening for the earlier detection of breast cancer.” (Source: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation)

Videos for Breast Cancer Awareness

In honour of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we have the following videos on display outside Media Services at NDC Library. They are available to all staff and students at the College (online resources will require your RRC log in information).

At My Mother’s Breast
Heather is 27 years old, and the daughter of a woman with breast cancer, who is the daughter of a woman with breast cancer, who is the daughter of a woman with breast cancer. She grew up waiting for her mom to get sick and wondering when she would follow. In this video, Heather illustrates how this illness changes mothers and daughters and how they come out forever changed. Also available in streaming format.

Autopsy Life & Death: Tumors
Anatomist Gunther von Hagens and pathologist John Lee expose cancer for what it is–an attacker that can quickly and stealthily infiltrate the human body. Also available in streaming format.

Big C: Pathophysiology of Cancer
Provides an update and overview on the pathophysiology of cancer. Specific cancers to be discussed include breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, hematologic malignancies, brain tumors and GI cancers. Also available in streaming format.

Cancer Story: Prevention and Screening
Highlights prevention models that have led to reductions in the incidence of cancer by behaviorial changes, such as smoking cessation and/or weight loss, and medical procedures.

Cancer Story: What is Cancer?
Presents a basic explanation of how normal cells behave and cancer cells begin. This is illustrated by following a hypothetical cancer patient through diagnosis and treatment.

Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies
Presents a history of cancer, from ancient times to the present day. Includes stories of contemporary patients and examines the latest scientific research which might indicate that we are on the brink of a lasting cure.

Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Examines side effects of cancer treatments and  suggests ways to combat these effects and feel better despite the likelihood of pain, nausea and other debilitations. Also available in streaming format.

Estrogen: Friend or Foe
Estrogen, the “female” hormone, has over 300 functions in practically all body tissues. In this presentation, Barb discusses the myriad of functions and correlates them with clinical examples. She also discusses the role of estrogen in breast cancer and other diseases that commonly afflict women. Also available in streaming format.

Pink Ribbons (online resource)
A feature documentary that shows how the devastating reality of breast cancer, which marketing experts have labeled a “dream cause,” has been hijacked by a shiny, pink story of success.

Run Your Own Race
Dr. Marla Shapiro, host of CTV’s daytime series Balance: Television for Living Well and medical consultant for CTV News, tells her private story, from diagnosis to recovery. This one-hour special aired on CTV to coincide with Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October of 2005.

Thunder Blanket (online resource)
A 5-part series that explores a young Aboriginal woman’s battle against breast cancer and the complexity of being a traditionalist searching for a cure in a modern world.

Uncovering the Social Determinants of Health
Health disparities between various populations are a critical social justice issue. To illustrate mechanisms of disparity, Dr. Buki uses breast cancer in Latina women as a model to demonstrate the psychosocial, cultural, and institutional factors that combine to produce lower survivorship rates.

Wit
An English professor, who alienates her students, has always had control over her life. That is until she is diagnosed with a devastating illness. She agrees to undergo a series of procedures that are brutal, extensive and experimental. She finds that the fine line between life and death can only be walked with wit.

Questions or recommendations?

If you have questions, or you are an instructor and would like to recommend a purchase, please contact  AV Services at NDC:

  • Phone: 204-632-2231
  • Email: media@rrc.ca

Videos for Mental Illness Awareness #MIAW17

October 4, 2017 • Written by

Mental HealthGoal of MIAW: Reduce Stigma and Increase Awareness

One in five Canadians will experience a mental health problem or illness in a given year. Many such victims face the reality that misconceptions about mental illness abound. Reducing stigma and increasing awareness of mental illness is the main purpose of Mental Illness Awareness Week (October 1-7, 2017). Check out the videos below for real stories of tragedy and triumph as sufferers (and the professionals who treat them) speak out and share their stories. RRC Library video resources are available to all staff and students at the College.

Learn more about MIAW >> Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW)

Videos for Mental Illness Awareness

In honour of MIAW, the following videos are on display outside Media Services, NDC Library.

Available on DVD

Anxiety Disorders: An Overview An overview of anxiety disorders — panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, specific phobias, and obsessive compulsive disorder — provided by the Anxiety Disorders Association of Manitoba (ADAM).

Beyond the Blues: Child and Youth Depression Through the personal stories of three young people, this compelling documentary traces the journey of depression, from early signs and symptoms, to assessment, diagnosis and treatment. Also available in streaming format.

Darkness in the Afternoon A story seen through the eyes of Marie, who has dementia, and her inner reality of seeing her husband as a threatening stranger.

Depression: a Cognitive Therapy Approach Demonstrates critical interventions in a representative course of cognitive therapy with a patient who meets diagnostic criteria for major depression as well as dysthymia.

Drummer Boy Things go terribly wrong for 18 year old Philip Renold. He drops out of school to sort it all out, but matters only get worse, until it seems there is only one thing he can do to save his life and his sanity.

Flight from Darkness Focuses on the life of Percy Paul, from his dazzling rise and fall as a brilliant mathematician to his continuing struggle to prevail over his illness and realize his full potential.

Going to Extremes Looks at two major categories of mood disorders–depression and bipolar disorder–and at the cluster of psychoses known as schizophrenia.

Louis Theroux: Extreme Love: Dementia Louis Theroux spends time with America’s growing population of dementia sufferers and carers seeing how families maintain relationships with their loved ones even as the building blocks of personality and character are eroded by this illness.

Mixed Anxiety and Depression: a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach Internationally renowned therapist Donald Meichenbaum demonstrates a brief, effective approach for treating anxiety and depression.

My Name is Walter James Cross This compelling dramatic monologue presents an accurate depiction of the devastating, costly, much maligned, and misunderstood illness called schizophrenia.

Preventing and Managing Stress Learn from experts about the causes of stress and how to lessen its negative impacts.

Racing Thoughts A film about children who live with mental illness and their loved ones who make the courageous decision to open up about their stories.

Not Just a Bad Day: Living With Bipolar Disorder Profiles four individuals who live under the shadow of bipolar disorder – one of the most commonly misunderstood and misdiagnosed mental illnesses.

Scared Stiff: Fast, Effective Treatment for Anxiety Disorders Dr. David Burns will illustrate how to integrate all three models (Cognitive, Behavioral, Hidden Emotional) in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

Speaking from Experience: Families and Mental Illness This guide is intended to help family, friends, and other carers of people who have been seriously affected by mental illness.

Teens at Risk: Suicidal Signs Raising teenagers with mental health issues can be a difficult and very challenging experience. Parents and teenagers tell their stories of struggle as they learn how some families cope with parenting a mentally ill teen.

These Forgotten Voices: A Choir that Defies Prejudice The fifteen singers featured in this concert all have mental health problems. Witness an amazing change as the participants evolve from their difficult first singing lessons to their highly successful concert.

This Beggar’s Description He as been locked up in jails and psych wards, kicked out of the house, and spent long periods living on the streets of Montréal. This is the story of Phil Tétrault and the far-reaching effects of schizophrenia.

Voices of Resiliency: Hearing, Sharing, Learning with Each Other Compiled from the 2006 Voices of Resiliency Conference hosted by the Manitoba Schizophrenia Society. Features thought-provoking discussions that capture the stories of recovery of individuals living with schizophrenia and depression.

Whisper: Coping With Suicide in Aboriginal Communities Aimed at community workers, this video addresses the prevalence of suicide in Canada’s Aboriginal communities.

Work and Recovery: Stories of Employment and Mental Health Introduces five people assisted by employment services that support evidence-based practices. Their stories remind us how important work can be to a person’s recovery journey.

Available through our online collection (log in required)

Being Greene (Curio.ca) This Firsthand documentary takes an intimate look at one family’s struggle to break free from the clutches of mental illness.

Age of Anxiety (Curio.ca) Anxiety. It’s being called the disease of the 21st century.  Age of Anxiety examines what anxiety is, and how and why it is being re-defined by the medical and pharmaceutical industries.

Pinel: A glimpse into the suffering of mental illness (Curio.ca) Pinel tells the story of three men who committed a violent crime while experiencing psychosis. They were found not criminally responsible by reason of mental disorder and hospitalized at Pinel, a maximum-security institution specializing in the treatment of violent behavior linked to mental illness.

Stigma (NFB.ca) This film tells the story of a young woman who suffers a mental breakdown, recovers fully in a mental hospital and returns home. Instead of the understanding and support she most needs from her friends and associates, she is virtually ostracized. The film makes a plea for a change in the sort of public thinking that places a stigma upon people who have suffered from an illness of the mind rather than of the body.

OCD: The War Inside (NFB.ca) This feature documentary explores the daily lives of individuals living with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), a misunderstood anxiety disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts, nagging fears and ritualistic behaviour. From the outside, its sufferers have no physical disabilities and have every appearance of being as functional as the next person. But inside, a daily war is waged for survival.

If you have questions, or are an instructor who would like to suggest a purchase, please contact AV Services, NDC:
  • Phone: 204-632-2231
  • Email: media@rrc.ca

RRC Library: Much More Than Books

August 28, 2017 • Written by

Red River College Library extends a warm welcome to all new and returning staff and students. We are here to support you as you learn, teach, study and move forward in your careers.

Your RRC Library offers so much more than books! Take a few minutes to get familiar with the spaces and services we provide you.

The Library Spaces

The Libraries at the Exchange District Campus (EDC) and Notre Dame Campus (NDC) provide you with reading areas, study spaces (individual and small group), media viewing areas, computers, printers, copiers, and a scanning station.

Red River College Libraries

Loads of Resources

All students and staff have access to the Library’s books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. What you see when you walk in is just the tip of the iceberg, and many of our digital resources may be accessed in the comfort of your home and on your mobile device.

>> Learn about our new OneSearch discovery system

>> Browse our Subject Guides

Services to Support You

The staff at the Library will help you:

  • Locate information for assignments, research, instruction, personal use
  • Use all types of Library resources and search tools
  • Work with computers and applications such as Microsoft Office
  • Troubleshoot technical issues, including wireless and account log in
  • Find your way around the College and locate people who can help you

>> Learn more about RRC Library Services

Most importantly, we want you to know that you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!

2nd Annual Mini-Golf Event: Photo Highlights

June 8, 2017 • Written by

Here are some photo highlights of our 2nd annual mini-golf tournament at Red River College Library, Notre Dame Campus. A big thank-you goes to Bettina Allen for planning the event and to all of the Library staff who volunteered to make it happen. It was great to see RRC staff and students having so much fun in the Library!

 

 

Canada 150 Collections on Curio

April 24, 2017 • Written by

A nation-wide celebration is currently under way as Canada turns 150. Staff at CBC have curated special collections of video and radio productions to commemorate Canada’s Sesquicentennial. What better way to celebrate than to watch and listen to quality Canadian programming on CBC’s Curio? (RRC network log in required)

CANADA 150 COLLECTIONS:

Canada 150: Contemporary Indigenous Voices

This collection focuses on cultural awareness, traditional knowledge and the contemporary challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples across Canada as we begin to explore reconciliation together.


Canada 150: Diversity and Inclusion

Our diversity as Canadians is one of our distinctive traits as a country. This collection examines the triumphs, lessons, struggles and challenges that continue to shape our multifaceted identity.


Canada 150: Innovation, Science and Technology

This collection focuses on Canadian contributions in science and technology, as well as accomplishments demonstrating our innovative spirit.


Canada 150: Key Events

Drawing on CBC’s archive of documentaries and news reports, this is a collection of big events throughout Canada’s first 150 years. Curio staff will keep adding to this collection as the year goes on. Let us know your suggestions!


Canada 150: Business and Economic Development

This collection presents some of the great moments that have marked the history of business in Canada and highlights some of the issues that have had a significant impact on the country’s economic development.


Canada 150: Immigration

Immigration is one of the central themes in Canadian history. While many came to Canada to pursue economic opportunity, others arrived because of an urgent need to flee persecution. Hear the diverse stories of the many who have come to Canada in search of a new home.


Canada 150: Icons

Putting together a list of Canadian icons is a big task, but CBC’s archives are deep and varied. This collection will keep growing as Canada’s 150th celebrations continue throughout 2017!


LEARN MORE:

Visit the Canada 150 website!

Simple Stress Soothers

March 8, 2017 • Written by

Are you overwhelmed? …Worried? …Run down?

Here are some quick and easy solutions to help you counteract the stress in your life. These are borrowed from Deborah Davis’s book, Adult learner’s companion (pages 28, 29), available at Red River College Library.

⇒ Take deep breaths

Deep breathing calms you and helps you think more clearly.

Look further: Stress Management: Breathing Exercises for Relaxation

⇒ Think before you speak

Listening and thinking before speaking allows you to respond to others calmly and appropriately, which results in better feelings all around.

Look further: Think Before you Speak (3 min video)

Find some physical activity

Any form of exercise is a stress-reliever. Even a ten-minute walk during break is beneficial. Exercise also tires you and helps you sleep better.

Look further: Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress

Make a date

Connect with others, get out of yourself and have a few laughs.

Eat slowly

It is better for digestion, you will enjoy your food more, and it may help you lose weight.

Look further: Top Ten Mindful Eating Apps

Turn off the TV

Some people use TV to zone out, as a way to avoid dealing with their stress. This may make you feel better temporarily, but in the long run it actually adds to your stress.

Eat stress-reducing foods

The right foods have the power to calm you, lower stress hormones, build up the immune system, and lower blood pressure. Sunflower seeds and oatmeal are among foods that can help fight stress.

Look further: How to Eat Right to Reduce Stress

Change your perception

Changing how you look at something can completely change your experience of it. Taking control of your thoughts is a powerful stress reliever.

Look further: The Art of Thinking Differently


More on Stress:

For more information on stress management and other resources at RRC Library, stop by the Library desk or contact our reference staff at:

 

 

Music: Mind Medicine and More

March 2, 2017 • Written by

Music has long been recognized for its ability to trigger memories. Dr. Anne Fabiny says, “Some people, who had seemed unable to speak, proceed to sing and dance to the music, and others are able to recount when and where they had listened to that music. The music seems to open doors to the residents’ memory vaults” (Source: Music can boost memory and mood, Harvard Women’s Health Watch. Mar2015, Vol. 22 Issue 7, p7-7. 2/3p.).

Alive Inside: Music Reawakens Souls

Alive Inside is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music.

View the trailer here:

To view the full video, click here: Alive Inside (RRC network log in required)

Music for Motor Skills and Pain

Music and dance have been used to improve movements and motor skills in patients with Parkinson’s for years. One such patient, Larry Jennings, would be debilitated by Parkinson’s at one moment, and dancing and singing to music at the next. View the transformation on CTV News here: ‘Instantaneous results’: How music transformed a man with Parkinson’s.

Not only does music trigger memories and improve motor skills, “Listening to music is known to raise people’s pain thresholds, so much so that in some cases, it can be used to reduce the need for morphine-like painkillers,” says Penny Sarchet in Brain on music kills pain of workouts (New Scientist. 8/8/2015, Vol. 227 Issue 3033, p10-10. 1p. 1). Listening to music can also reduce the perceived amount of effort in exercise, can enhance mood and impact our immune system.

An Investigation by The Nature of Things

I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song (RRC network log in required) is an episode of The Nature of Things which investigates the effects of music on human beings: “Why do we sing? Are we hardwired for melodies? Scientists and musicians explore the many ways that music profoundly affects the human body, the brain and human emotions. It’s one of the oldest forms of communication, and like language, music seems an essential tool employed by humans for multiple needs.” (Source: Curio.ca)

More on How Music Benefits the Brain:

Viola Desmond: A Story of Courage

February 13, 2017 • Written by

In February 2008, Senator Donald Oliver, the first Black man appointed to the Senate, introduced the Motion to Recognize Contributions of Black Canadians and February as Black History Month. It received unanimous approval and was adopted on March 4, 2008. Since then, February is an official time to celebrate Black Canadians – their experiences, stories, achievements and contributions.

Learn more: Government of Canada – Black History Month

VIOLA DESMOND (1914-1965):
Entrepreneur and Defender of Social Justice

The 2017 Black History Month poster (pictured right) shows Viola Desmond as an example of the courage and strength shown by so many Black Canadians throughout history.

Watch, listen and read about how Viola Desmond and other Black Canadians have taken a stand against racial segregation in Canada.

 


Heritage Minutes: Viola Desmond (Historica Canada video)

The story of Viola Desmond, an entrepreneur who challenged segregation in Nova Scotia in the 1940s. The 82nd Heritage Minute in Historica Canada’s collection. (1 min.)


Living in Hope: Viola Desmond’s Story (CBC Radio broadcast)

A dramatized account of a pivotal moment in Canadian race relations. On November 8, 1946 Viola Desmond refuses to move to the upstairs balcony in the Roseland Theatre, and is forcibly removed from the theatre and thrown in jail. The resulting legal battle was taken all the way to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. (RRC network log in required)


Viola Desmond’s Canada : a history of Blacks and racial segregation in the promised land (Book)

Most Canadians are aware of Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated bus in Alabama, but Viola Desmond’s act of resistance occurred nine years earlier. However, many Canadians are still unaware of Desmond’s story or that racial segregation existed throughout many parts of Canada during most of the twentieth century. On the subject of race, Canadians seem to exhibit a form of collective amnesia. Viola Desmond’s Canada is a groundbreaking book that provides a concise overview of the narrative of the Black experience in Canada. (Available to borrow from RRC Library)

 


Journey to Justice (NFB video)

Click the image to view the movie on the National Film Board website.

 

“This documentary pays tribute to a group of Canadians who took racism to court. They are Canada’s unsung heroes in the fight for Black civil rights. Focusing on the 1930s to the 1950s, this film documents the struggle of 6 people who refused to accept inequality. Featured here, among others, are Viola Desmond, a woman who insisted on keeping her seat at a Halifax movie theatre in 1946 rather than moving to the section normally reserved for the city’s Black population, and Fred Christie, who took his case to the Supreme Court after being denied service at a Montreal tavern in 1936. These brave pioneers helped secure justice for all Canadians. Their stories deserve to be told.” – NFB website

 

CBC News in Review: January 2017 Edition

January 31, 2017 • Written by

Here is a round-up of the latest edition of CBC News in Review – a closer look at current events. (RRC network log in required to view.)

Europe’s Discontent: The Backlash of Populism

“The results of the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom and the U.S. presidential election in 2016 may have caught many by surprise, but those who study political philosophy say it’s all part of an anti-establishment backlash. It indicates a return to so-called “populism,” where the people want more say in the direction of their country. And that could spell major changes for the leaders of many European nations in the near future.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Revealing Selfies: The Consequences of Sexting

“Sharing a sexy selfie with your latest crush may seem harmless, but once online those images live forever. Recently six male teens found out the hard way that sharing intimate pictures of their female schoolmates was also against the law. CBC reporter Ioanna Roumeliotis went to a high school in Nova Scotia to talk to teens about the pressure to share those intimate photos, and steps being taken to help kids understand the consequences.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Fidel Castro: Brutal Dictator or Visionary Revolutionist?

“The death of Fidel Castro in late November 2016 had Cubans mourning while expats were celebrating. He was a polarizing figure, larger than life and an enigma. He’s been a long-time friend of Canada thanks to a friendship with former prime minister Pierre Trudeau, and an arch enemy of America — at least until former U.S. president Barack Obama tried to end that Cold War. Now incoming President Donald Trump will likely end any agreements made and Cuba’s future is uncertain once again.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Disinformation and Lies: The Dangers of Fake News

“When a man walked into a New York pizza parlour in December 2016 with an assault rifle and said he was checking out the story that there was a child sex-trafficking ring in the basement, run by former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, the world took notice. It was a fake news story called “Pizzagate”, planted online, that went viral. Now it’s getting harder to tell truth from fiction on the Internet. But why has “fake news” spiked?  Some say it’s because there’s money to be made. Others say it’s foreign countries trying to manipulate the outcome of important events such as the U.S. presidential election. Whatever the case, “fake news” has gone viral.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

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