International Women’s Day 2018 #PressforProgress

International Women’s Day is coming. Let’s get ready. March 8, 2018

#PressforProgress

With the World Economic Forum’s 2017 Global Gender Gap Report findings telling us that gender parity is over 200 years away – there has never been a more important time to keep motivated and #PressforProgress. And with global activism for women’s equality fuelled by movements like #MeToo, #TimesUp and more – there is a strong global momentum striving for gender parity.

And while we know that gender parity won’t happen overnight, the good news is that across the world women are making positive gains day by day. Plus, there’s indeed a very strong and growing global movement of advocacy, activism and support.

So we can’t be complacent. Now, more than ever, there’s a strong call-to-action to press forward and progress gender parity. A strong call to #PressforProgress. A strong call to motivate and unite friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.

International Women’s Day is not country, group or organisation specific. The day belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. So together, let’s all be tenacious in accelerating gender parity. Collectively, let’s all Press for Progress.

Reference: https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Theme

 

RRC Library Resources

The Red River College Library maintains items related to “Gender Equality” and “Gender Parity” in our collection; patrons are encouraged to search our online catalogue for resources. In addition, please check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed related resources.

You may view a list of items in our window display here:
http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.

 

Lean in : women, work, and the will to lead

Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In this book the author examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential. She is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune magazine’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=126441

 

Canadian women and the struggle for equality since 1867

The lives of girls and women have seen an astounding degree of transformation over the last 150 years. At the time of Confederation, females were not considered persons, legally or in many respects even socially. Today, while there is still a considerable distance to go, the opportunities available to women have grown exponentially. Lorna R. Marsden-sociologist, past Canadian senator, and activist-explores social change in Canada’s unique setting. The stories of how women seized opportunities to advance their status are both surprising and compelling, and reveal as much about Canada as a country as they do about the long road toward equality that women have travelled. Chapters provide absorbing insights into how change takes place over a range of topics, including the law, demographics, work, and social institutions; substantial advancement also took place in the wake of two world wars. Book jacket.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=118138

 

About Canada: Women’s rights

About Canada : women’s rights introduces readers to some of the many women who changed Canada through their efforts to secure greater equality. While a few are well known, many of these women and the battles they won have been forgotten. They deserve a greater place in Canada’s history.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=126362

 

 

Women and business since 1500 : invisible presences in Europe and North America?

This volume surveys the role women have played in various types of business as owners, co-owners and decision-making managers in European and North American societies since the sixteenth century. Drawing on up-to-date scholarship, it identifies the economic, social, legal and cultural factors that have facilitated or restricted women’s participation in business. It pays particular attention to the ways in which gender norms, and their evolution, shaped not only those women’s experience of business, but the ways they were perceived by contemporaries, documented in sources and, partly as a consequence, viewed by historians.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=127125

 

Making space for Indigenous feminism

The 2007 first edition of this book proposed that Indigenous feminism was a valid and indeed essential theoretical and activist position, and introduced a roster of important Indigenous feminist contributors. The book has been well received nationally and internationally. It has been deployed in Indigenous Studies, Law, Political Science, and Women and Gender Studies in universities and appears on a number of doctoral comprehensive exam reading lists. The second edition, Making More Space, builds on the success of its predecessor, but is not merely a reiteration of it. Some chapters from the first edition are largely revised. A majority of the chapters are new, written for the second edition by important new scholars and activists. The second edition is more confident and less diffident about making the case for Indigenous feminism and in deploying a feminist analysis. The chapters cover issues that are relevant to some of the most important issues facing Indigenous people–violence against women, recovery of Indigenous self-determination, racism, misogyny, and decolonisation. Specifically, new chapters deal with Indigenous resurgence, feminism amongst the Sami and in Aboriginal Australia, neoliberal restructuring in Oaxaca, Canada’s settler racism and sexism, and missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130795