Pink Shirt Day: Take a Stand on Bullying

Check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed library resources related to bullying and Pink Shirt Day.

On February 28, 2018, we encourage everyone to practice kindness and wear pink to symbolize that you do not tolerate bullying.

Bullying is a major problem in our schools, workplaces, homes, and online. Over the month of February, and throughout the year, CKNW Kids’ Fund’s Pink Shirt Day aims to raise awareness of these issues, as well as raise funds to support programs that foster children’s healthy self-esteem.


How it began

Now a movement celebrated across the globe, Pink Shirt Day has humble beginnings. Inspired by an act of kindness in small-town Nova Scotia, CKNW Kids’ Fund, working with partners Boys & Girls Clubs and CKNW 980, was inspired to raise funds to support anti-bullying programs. Here is a snippet of an article detailing the original incident:

“David Shepherd, Travis Price and their teenage friends organized a high-school protest to wear pink in sympathy with a Grade 9 boy who was being bullied [for wearing a pink shirt]…[They] took a stand against bullying when they protested against the harassment of a new Grade 9 student by distributing pink T-shirts to all the boys in their school. ‘I learned that two people can come up with an idea, run with it, and it can do wonders,’ says Mr. Price, 17, who organized the pink protest. ‘Finally, someone stood up for a weaker kid.’ So Mr. Shepherd and some other headed off to a discount store and bought 50 pink tank tops. They sent out message to schoolmates that night, and the next morning they hauled the shirts to school in a plastic bag. As they stood in the foyer handing out the shirts, the bullied boy walked in. His face spoke volumes. ‘It looked like a huge weight was lifted off his shoulders,’ Mr. Price recalled. The bullies were never heard from again.” — GLOBE & MAIL

After David and Travis’ act of kindness in 2007, CKNW was inspired to help other youth affected by bullying, with many staff members wearing pink shirts and collecting funds to support Boys and Girls Clubs. Since then, the idea has only grown each year, with worldwide support and participation. Countries across the globe are now organizing anti-bullying fundraisers of their own, including Japan, New Zealand, China, Panama, and numerous others. In fact, last year alone, people in almost 180 countries shared their support of Pink Shirt Day through social media posts and donations.


Notre Dame Campus Window Display

Check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed library resources related to bullying:

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.


Am I safe here? : LGBTQ teens and bullying in schools

Every day, LGBTQ students ask this question within the school system. This book shines a light on the marginalization and bullying faced by LGBTQ youth, offering a new conceptualization of school safety. Donn Short treats students as the experts on what happens in their schools, giving them a chance to speak for themselves. They identify what it would take to make a school truly safe–insightfully explaining that safety doesn’t come merely from security cameras, ID tags, and dress codes, but from a culture that values equity and social justice.


Cyberbullying through the new media : findings from an international network

Cyberbullying is one of the darker and more troubling aspects to the growing accessibility of new media technologies. Children in developed countries engage with cyberspace at younger and younger ages, and the use of the internet as a means to bully and harass has been greeted with alarm by educationalists, parents, the media, and governments. This important new book is the result of a four-year international collaboration, funded by the EU, to better understand how we can cope and confront cyberbullying, and how new media technologies can be used to actually support the victims of such abuse. The articles initially define the historical and theoretical context to cyberbullying, before examining key issues involved in managing this pervasive phenomenon.


I am not a slut : slut-shaming in the age of the Internet

Explores the phenomenon of slut-shaming in the age of sexting, tweeting, and “liking.” She shows that the sexual double standard is more dangerous than ever before and offers wisdom and strategies for alleviating its destructive effects on young women’s lives. Young women are encouraged to express themselves sexually. Yet when they do, they are derided as “sluts.” Caught in a double bind of mixed sexual messages, young women are confused. To fulfill the contradictory roles of being sexy but not slutty, they create an “experienced” identity on social media-even if they are not sexually active – while ironically referring to themselves and their friends as “sluts.” But this strategy can become a weapon used against young women in the hands of peers who circulate rumors and innuendo – elevating age-old slut-shaming to deadly levels, with suicide among bullied teenage girls becoming increasingly common.


Sticks and stones : defeating the culture of bullying and rediscovering the power of character and empathy

Being a teenager has never been easy, but in recent years, with the rise of the Internet and social media, it has become exponentially more challenging. Bullying, once thought of as the province of queen bees and goons, has taken on new, complex, and insidious forms.


Tilt your head, Rosie the red

Rosie is upset when her friend Fadimata is bullied because she wears a headscarf. But Rosie has learned that if you tilt your head even a little, you can see the world through someone else’s eyes. By thinking about things differently, Rosie comes up with a surprising plan to help her friend. Her solution proves that differences can be celebrated.


The drama years : real girls talk about surviving middle school — bullies, brands, body image, and more

An urgently needed and insightful guidebook for parents and teachers struggling to help girls navigate the often-difficult transition into adolescence by the founder of Girl Talk.It has never been easy to be a middle school girl. In the few short years between grade school and high school, girls go through an incredible number of physical and mental changes, making this the most formative–and precarious–time in their lives. Groups form and turn on each other; classmates whisper about who’s saying what to whom; childhood friends tell trusted secrets; and just deciding where to sit in the lunchroom can be a daily struggle.