February 2018

Pink Shirt Day: Take a Stand on Bullying

February 26, 2018 • Written by

Check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed library resources related to bullying and Pink Shirt Day.

On February 28, 2018, we encourage everyone to practice kindness and wear pink to symbolize that you do not tolerate bullying.

Bullying is a major problem in our schools, workplaces, homes, and online. Over the month of February, and throughout the year, CKNW Kids’ Fund’s Pink Shirt Day aims to raise awareness of these issues, as well as raise funds to support programs that foster children’s healthy self-esteem.

Reference: https://www.pinkshirtday.ca/

How it began

Now a movement celebrated across the globe, Pink Shirt Day has humble beginnings. Inspired by an act of kindness in small-town Nova Scotia, CKNW Kids’ Fund, working with partners Boys & Girls Clubs and CKNW 980, was inspired to raise funds to support anti-bullying programs. Here is a snippet of an article detailing the original incident:

“David Shepherd, Travis Price and their teenage friends organized a high-school protest to wear pink in sympathy with a Grade 9 boy who was being bullied [for wearing a pink shirt]…[They] took a stand against bullying when they protested against the harassment of a new Grade 9 student by distributing pink T-shirts to all the boys in their school. ‘I learned that two people can come up with an idea, run with it, and it can do wonders,’ says Mr. Price, 17, who organized the pink protest. ‘Finally, someone stood up for a weaker kid.’ So Mr. Shepherd and some other headed off to a discount store and bought 50 pink tank tops. They sent out message to schoolmates that night, and the next morning they hauled the shirts to school in a plastic bag. As they stood in the foyer handing out the shirts, the bullied boy walked in. His face spoke volumes. ‘It looked like a huge weight was lifted off his shoulders,’ Mr. Price recalled. The bullies were never heard from again.” — GLOBE & MAIL

After David and Travis’ act of kindness in 2007, CKNW was inspired to help other youth affected by bullying, with many staff members wearing pink shirts and collecting funds to support Boys and Girls Clubs. Since then, the idea has only grown each year, with worldwide support and participation. Countries across the globe are now organizing anti-bullying fundraisers of their own, including Japan, New Zealand, China, Panama, and numerous others. In fact, last year alone, people in almost 180 countries shared their support of Pink Shirt Day through social media posts and donations.

Reference: https://www.pinkshirtday.ca/

Notre Dame Campus Window Display

Check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed library resources related to bullying:

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.

 

Am I safe here? : LGBTQ teens and bullying in schools

Every day, LGBTQ students ask this question within the school system. This book shines a light on the marginalization and bullying faced by LGBTQ youth, offering a new conceptualization of school safety. Donn Short treats students as the experts on what happens in their schools, giving them a chance to speak for themselves. They identify what it would take to make a school truly safe–insightfully explaining that safety doesn’t come merely from security cameras, ID tags, and dress codes, but from a culture that values equity and social justice.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130525

 

Cyberbullying through the new media : findings from an international network

Cyberbullying is one of the darker and more troubling aspects to the growing accessibility of new media technologies. Children in developed countries engage with cyberspace at younger and younger ages, and the use of the internet as a means to bully and harass has been greeted with alarm by educationalists, parents, the media, and governments. This important new book is the result of a four-year international collaboration, funded by the EU, to better understand how we can cope and confront cyberbullying, and how new media technologies can be used to actually support the victims of such abuse. The articles initially define the historical and theoretical context to cyberbullying, before examining key issues involved in managing this pervasive phenomenon.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=122454

 

I am not a slut : slut-shaming in the age of the Internet

Explores the phenomenon of slut-shaming in the age of sexting, tweeting, and “liking.” She shows that the sexual double standard is more dangerous than ever before and offers wisdom and strategies for alleviating its destructive effects on young women’s lives. Young women are encouraged to express themselves sexually. Yet when they do, they are derided as “sluts.” Caught in a double bind of mixed sexual messages, young women are confused. To fulfill the contradictory roles of being sexy but not slutty, they create an “experienced” identity on social media-even if they are not sexually active – while ironically referring to themselves and their friends as “sluts.” But this strategy can become a weapon used against young women in the hands of peers who circulate rumors and innuendo – elevating age-old slut-shaming to deadly levels, with suicide among bullied teenage girls becoming increasingly common.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=125517

 

Sticks and stones : defeating the culture of bullying and rediscovering the power of character and empathy

Being a teenager has never been easy, but in recent years, with the rise of the Internet and social media, it has become exponentially more challenging. Bullying, once thought of as the province of queen bees and goons, has taken on new, complex, and insidious forms.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=120318

 

Tilt your head, Rosie the red

Rosie is upset when her friend Fadimata is bullied because she wears a headscarf. But Rosie has learned that if you tilt your head even a little, you can see the world through someone else’s eyes. By thinking about things differently, Rosie comes up with a surprising plan to help her friend. Her solution proves that differences can be celebrated.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=125083

 

The drama years : real girls talk about surviving middle school — bullies, brands, body image, and more

An urgently needed and insightful guidebook for parents and teachers struggling to help girls navigate the often-difficult transition into adolescence by the founder of Girl Talk.It has never been easy to be a middle school girl. In the few short years between grade school and high school, girls go through an incredible number of physical and mental changes, making this the most formative–and precarious–time in their lives. Groups form and turn on each other; classmates whisper about who’s saying what to whom; childhood friends tell trusted secrets; and just deciding where to sit in the lunchroom can be a daily struggle.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=117377

Black History Month Videos Now on Display

February 1, 2018 • Written by

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of Black Canadians through history. They have helped make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation it is today. This compilation of videos, now on display at NDC Library, was created in their honour.

Black History in Canada Video List

Black Soul  Martine Chartrand’s animated short dives into the heart of Black culture with an exhilarating trip though history. Watch as a young boy traces his roots through the stories his grandmother shares with him about the events that shaped their cultural heritage.

Book of Negroes Based on the award-winning novel by Lawrence Hill, The Book of Negroes depicts the extraordinary life journey of Aminata Diallo, an indomitable African woman who cuts a swath through a world that is predisposed to underestimate her. Kidnapped by slave traders in West Africa and subsequently enslaved in South Carolina, Aminata must navigate her way through the American Revolution in New York, the isolated refuge given to Black Loyalists in Nova Scotia and the treacherous jungles of Sierra Leone, before ultimately securing her freedom in England at the dawn of the 19th century.

Brother 2 Brother An inspirational film about one man’s power to change; Corey Lucas is an African Canadian living in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. With a head full of dreams and empty pockets he turned to selling drugs on the street. Now as the father of a three-year old son, he tries to reconcile the life he knows with his desire to be a responsible father and a supporting partner. He experiences the transformative power of a weekend retreat for young Black males, organized by BROS (the Brothers Reaching Out Society). The story shows that despite all the odds against them young Black men can succeed if they have the will, the opportunity and the support of a community.

Deeply Rooted Filmmaker Cazhhmere is a seventh-generation black Canadian. Despite this deep history, she’s constantly asked to explain where she’s from — even though the answer is always “Canada.” Cazhhmere is a proud Canadian. Her ancestors were among the first black settlers to come to Canada — her family has spent hundreds of years weaving itself into the fabric of our nation. Despite this deep history, Cazhhmere is constantly questioned about where she is originally from. In Deeply Rooted, Cazhhmere will change your perception of what a multi-generational Canadian family looks like. In a country that is widely known for being a “global melting pot,” our nation can easily forget that not every person of colour is a newcomer to Canada.

Everybody’s Children Monika Delmos’s documentary captures a year in the life of two teenage refugees, Joyce and Sallieu, who have left their own countries to make a new life in Ontario. Joyce, 17, left the Democratic Republic of Congo to avoid being forced into prostitution by her family. Sallieu, 16, had witnessed the murder of his mother as a young boy in wartorn Sierra Leone.

Delmos follows them as they bear the normal pressures of being a teenager while simultaneously undergoing the refugee application process. She shows how the guidance and support of a handful of people make a real difference in the day-to-day lives of these children.

Invisible City The film is set in the inner-city housing project of Toronto’s Regent Park; Kendell and Mikey, like their surroundings are in the process of transformation; the environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices, their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed. Turning his camera on the often ignored inner city, Academy-award nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream.

Journey to Justice This documentary pays tribute to a group of Canadians who took racism to court. They are Canada’s unsung heroes in the fight for Black civil rights. Focusing on the 1930s to the 1950s, this film documents the struggle of 6 people who refused to accept inequality. Featured here, among others, are Viola Desmond, a woman who insisted on keeping her seat at a Halifax movie theatre in 1946 rather than moving to the section normally reserved for the city’s Black population, and Fred Christie, who took his case to the Supreme Court after being denied service at a Montreal tavern in 1936. These brave pioneers helped secure justice for all Canadians. Their stories deserve to be told.

Remember Africville This short film depicts Africville, a small black settlement that lay within the city limits of Halifax, Nova Scotia. In the 1960s, the families there were uprooted and their homes demolished in the name of urban renewal and integration. More than 20 years later, the site of the community of Africville is a stark, under-utilized park. Former residents, their descendants and some of the decision-makers speak out and, with the help of archival photographs and films, tell the story of that painful relocation.

The Skin We’re In Urgent, controversial and undeniably honest, The Skin We’re In is a wake-up call to complacent Canadians. Racism is here. It is everywhere. It is us and we are it. Following celebrated journalist Desmond Cole as he researches his hotly anticipated book, this documentary from acclaimed director Charles Officer pulls back the curtain on racism in Canada.

Speakers for the Dead This documentary reveals some of the hidden history of Blacks in Canada. In the 1930s in rural Ontario, a farmer buried the tombstones of a Black cemetery to make way for a potato patch. In the 1980s, descendants of the original settlers, Black and White, came together to restore the cemetery, but there were hidden truths no one wanted to discuss. Deep racial wounds were opened. Scenes of the cemetery excavation, interviews with residents and re-enactments—including one of a baseball game where a broken headstone is used for home plate—add to the film’s emotional intensity.

Wide Eyed  Ms. Jane Elliott, in all-white, all-Christian, Riceville, Iowa, involved her students in an exercise in discrimination based on eye-color. It was her attempt to help them to understand some of the reasons why Black people were taking to the streets and demanding equitable treatment with whites. Since then she has conducted the same exercise with people of all ages in cities all over the United States and in several other countries.