CBC News in Review: January 2017 Edition

Here is a round-up of the latest edition of CBC News in Review – a closer look at current events. (RRC network log in required to view.)

Europe’s Discontent: The Backlash of Populism

“The results of the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom and the U.S. presidential election in 2016 may have caught many by surprise, but those who study political philosophy say it’s all part of an anti-establishment backlash. It indicates a return to so-called “populism,” where the people want more say in the direction of their country. And that could spell major changes for the leaders of many European nations in the near future.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Revealing Selfies: The Consequences of Sexting

“Sharing a sexy selfie with your latest crush may seem harmless, but once online those images live forever. Recently six male teens found out the hard way that sharing intimate pictures of their female schoolmates was also against the law. CBC reporter Ioanna Roumeliotis went to a high school in Nova Scotia to talk to teens about the pressure to share those intimate photos, and steps being taken to help kids understand the consequences.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Fidel Castro: Brutal Dictator or Visionary Revolutionist?

“The death of Fidel Castro in late November 2016 had Cubans mourning while expats were celebrating. He was a polarizing figure, larger than life and an enigma. He’s been a long-time friend of Canada thanks to a friendship with former prime minister Pierre Trudeau, and an arch enemy of America — at least until former U.S. president Barack Obama tried to end that Cold War. Now incoming President Donald Trump will likely end any agreements made and Cuba’s future is uncertain once again.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Disinformation and Lies: The Dangers of Fake News

“When a man walked into a New York pizza parlour in December 2016 with an assault rifle and said he was checking out the story that there was a child sex-trafficking ring in the basement, run by former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, the world took notice. It was a fake news story called “Pizzagate”, planted online, that went viral. Now it’s getting harder to tell truth from fiction on the Internet. But why has “fake news” spiked?  Some say it’s because there’s money to be made. Others say it’s foreign countries trying to manipulate the outcome of important events such as the U.S. presidential election. Whatever the case, “fake news” has gone viral.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca