November 2015

Being a Refugee in Canada: Insights from Curio and NFB

November 30, 2015 • Written by

CBC and NFB produce the best in informative documentaries and news reports that probe deeper into subjects that matter most to Canadians. The flood of Syrian refugees coming to Canada is a recent concern for Canadians. This blog post lists documentaries that provide a thoughtful investigation what it means to be a refugee (Syrian or otherwise).

CURIO: Syrian Refugee Crisis: Lessons from Vietnamese Boat People 

CURIO: Syrian Refugee Crisis: Lessons from Vietnamese Boat People

CURIO: Syrian Refugee Crisis: Lessons from Vietnamese Boat People

As desperate migrants from the Middle East and Africa make their way across Europe, many in Canada are reminded of another refugee crisis that hit close to home. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, Canada took in 60,000 refugees, at the time often called the “Vietnamese boat people.” CBC reporter Judy Trinh was four years old when her family fled from Vietnam.

CURIO: The Journey from Syria to Canada 

CURIO: The Journey from Syria to Canada

CURIO: The Journey from Syria to Canada

Danny Ramadan fled war-torn Syria in 2011 and eventually came to Vancouver in September 2014.

NFB: Tree That Remembers

NFB: Tree That Remembers

NFB: Tree That Remembers

In 1992 a young Iranian student hanged himself on the outskirts of a small Ontario town. Having escaped the Ayatollah’s regime and found a new home in Canada, he could not escape his past. In this film, Masoud Raouf documents the experiences of Iranian-Canadians – former political prisoners like himself – who were active in the Iranian democratic movement and continue to struggle with the past.

NFB: Who Gets In? 

NFB: Who Gets In?

NFB: Who Gets In?

Explores the many questions raised by Canada’s immigration policy in the face of one of the world’s largest immigration movements. Shot in 1988 in Africa, Canada and Hong Kong, the film reveals first-hand what Canadian immigration officials are looking for in potential new Canadians, and the economic, social and political priorities orienting their choices.

It’s Movember!

November 13, 2015 • Written by
Movember_StyleGuide

Click the image for a larger verssion

The Movember Foundation is a global charity committed to men living happier, healthier, longer lives. Since 2003, millions have joined the men’s health movement, raising $677 million and funding over 1,000 programs focusing on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, poor mental health and physical inactivity.

Movember Through the Years

Two mates (Travis Garone and Luke Slattery) meet up for a quiet beer in Melbourne, Australia, and the idea that sparked Movember is born. The moustache had all but disappeared from fashion trends. Could they bring it back? They found 30 guys willing to take up the challenge.

Read Movember’s Origin Story

Prostate cancer statistics

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian men (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers). It is the 3rd leading cause of death from cancer in men in Canada.

To provide the most current cancer statistics, researchers use statistical methods to estimate the number of new cancer cases and deaths until actual data become available.

Click the image for a larger verssion

Click the image for a larger verssion

Incidence and mortality

Incidence is the total number of new cases of cancer. Mortality is the number of deaths due to cancer.

It is estimated that in 2015:

  • 24,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. This represents 24% of all new cancer cases in men in 2015.
  • 4,100 men will die from prostate cancer. This represents 10% of all cancer deaths in men in 2015.
  • On average, 66 Canadian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer every day.
  • On average, 11 Canadian men will die from prostate cancer every day.

Read more: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/prostate/statistics/

Window Display

Look for a “Movember” display in the showcase window just outside the Notre Dame Campus Library. As well you can check out some related items in our Library Collection. We have placed several of these items in our Notre Dame Campus window display.

View list of Items

 

Veterans Week

November 3, 2015 • Written by
"Poppies by Benoit Aubry of Ottawa" by Benoit Aubry Original uploader was BenoitAubry at en.wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia; transferred to Commons by User:Skeezix1000 using CommonsHelper.(Original text : self-made). Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Poppies_by_Benoit_Aubry_of_Ottawa.JPG#/media/File:Poppies_by_Benoit_Aubry_of_Ottawa.JPG

“Poppies by Benoit Aubry of Ottawa” by Benoit Aubry  (Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons)

Make remembrance more than something you feel. Make it something you do.

Each year, from November 5 to 11, Canadians join together to celebrate Veterans’ Week – this year is no different. During this week, hundreds of commemorative ceremonies and events will take place across the country to recognize the achievements of our Veterans and honour those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

This Veterans’ Week, take the remembrance challenge. There are many ways to show that you remember and honour our Veterans. Visit the Veteran’s Week Web site for more information.

As well you can check out some related items in our Library Collection. We have placed several of these items in our Notre Dame Campus window display. Have a look when you come by, or check out the list of items here: http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

In Flanders Fields : the story of the poem by John McCrae

nlc007465-v6Included in our window display is “In Flanders Fields : the story of the poem by John McCrae”.  In May 2015 the poem “In Flanders Fields,” will mark 100 years since it was written. This special edition book serves to celebrate that anniversary.

Over the years, John McCrae’s poem has been recited by many generations who continue to cherish the underlying message of respect for the fallen and a longing for peace.

In this book, the lines of the celebrated poem are interwoven with fascinating information about the First World War (1914-1918) and details of daily life in the trenches in Europe. Also included are accounts of McCrae’s experience in his field hospital and the circumstances that led to the writing of “In Flanders Fields.”   (Goodreads.com)

Lest we forget.