April 2014

A Revolutionary Idea: Reading for Fun

April 28, 2014 • Written by

 

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies,” said Jojen.

“The man who never reads lives only one.”

―     George R.R. Martin,   A Dance with Dragons

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From the Recreational Reading Book – Exchange District Campus Library

At first glance it seems a Recreational Reading Book Exchange located in an academic library might cause some confusion.  There are already books therefore why have a place for potboilers, romances, and fantasy?  Besides already drawing you into the library after noticing book four in A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Marin, why not stay for the crash-course on how to search a database at the reference desk.  It’s not an outlandish idea, in fact many colleges and universities have developed their own leisure reading programs for students.

While Red River finds itself only minutes from the Millennium Library, some students may not be eligible for a library card.  If time is tight, money for students feels even tighter, to the point that $12.99 paperback looks like a splurge.  For others, myself included, it’s a case of books taking up space in personal libraries.  Perhaps it’s time to part with a copy, and hope it ends up as someone’s latest discovery.  The Recreational Reading Book Exchange may fulfill all those needs, and also enhances academic achievement in ways like:

  • increase your reading skills
  • increase vocabulary
  • help your writing skills
  • broaden reading horizons and cultural literacy

(-From Library Stocks Up on Leisure Reading, University of Guelph)

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Some comfy places to sit
Periodical Reading Room,John and Bonnie Buhler Library, Exchange District Campus

On April 24th the library solicited donations as part of the Red River College EcoFair proving donating gently used books also helps support the environment as well.  However, we take donations year round at both campuses, in any genre, for that one moment a reader wants a break from textbooks for a quick trip to New York, Northern Ontario, or Westeros.

Related Reading

At Your Leisure: Establishing a Popular Reading Collection at UBC Library
by Bailey Diers & Shannon Simpson

Why Your Academic Library Needs a Popular Reading Collection Now More Than Ever
By Pauline Dewan (EBSChost Database-Login Required)

Earth Day at NDC

April 16, 2014 • Written by

earth day

Red River College will once again be celebrating Earth Day.  You would be smart to watch for events throughout all campuses.

At the Notre Dame Campus, the Library will be participating in the “Sustainable Living EcoFair” which will be held in the Library Hallway on Thursday, April 24, between 11:00am – 2:00pm.  You may visit more than ten sustainability booths and enjoy some delicious local foods. Come on down and compete in some rousing sustainability games!

Library “Book Exchange” and “Plastic bag round up”!

If you bring a book, you may take a book!  We will accept ANY gently used book, not just fiction.  It’s that simple, and it’s a great way to reuse pre-loved and pre-enjoyed books.

Do you have plastic bags to recycle? The first 50 people to bring in a bunch of plastic shopping bags will receive a free reusable bag courtesy of the RRC Library.

When: Thursday, April 24, between 11:00am – 2:00pm
Two Locations: Library Hallway (NDC)  /  In the Atrium near Print Services (EDC)

NDC Library Window Display

Check out the colourful “Earth Day” display at the Notre Dame Library.  We are featuring many fantastic items from our collection.

The entire list of items in our Window Display is located here: http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

The Earth’s blanket : traditional teachings for sustainable living
earthsblanketEarly in the twentieth century, ethnographer James Teit wrote of the belief among the Nlaka’pmx people that plants and grasses are the blanket of the earth, and that if too much vegetation is destroyed, the earth weeps. In The Earth’s Blanket, ethnobotanist Nancy J. Turner explores the wealth of ecological knowledge and the spiritual connection to the natural world that is fundamental to indigenous cultures. Turner has worked with Aboriginal peoples in North America for more than twenty-five years, and her indigenous teachers have allowed her to share their perspectives about the natural world. Their teachings describe a rich variety of methods of harvesting – while maintaining and enhancing – our natural resources. More than just stories, these narratives underlie a belief system that informs everyday attitudes toward the earth.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100631

environmental problem solvingEnvironmental problem solving : a how-to guide
This book teaches those on both sides of the table to address their own preconceptions and approach hard issues critically, methodically, and fairly. Hughes combines aspects of the decision-making process from the fields of business, management, and communication science based on extensive research and ample practical experience in the field and classroom. He creates a logical framework to help guide thinking from identifying a problem to finding its solution. Using examples drawn from real-life situations, Environmental Problem Solving will become an invaluable guide for environmentalists, agency professionals, consultants, students, naturalists, and concerned citizens.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=99343

Everything under the sun : toward a brighter future on a small blue planet
EverythingSunCoverFinal.inddIn this latest offering from David Suzuki, the well-known scientist, author, and broadcaster explores the interconnectedness of the world’s myriad environmental challenges. The solutions are there, he argues; we just need the will to act together to bring about change. Suzuki delves into such provocative topics as the difference between human hunters and other predators, our dependence on the sun, and what we must learn from Japan’s recent reactor meltdown. He also doesn’t avoid controversial opinion, especially when it comes to taking on those who stand in the way of resolving serious issues like climate change.  Everything Under the Sun includes telling facts and stats, the latest scientific findings, and examples of the positive actions people are taking today toward protecting what we have. Underpinning it all is the recognition that Earth gives us everything we require to live, under a sun that provides the energy to produce food, transport, and all of our modern conveniences.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=117378

get outGet out! : 150 easy ways for kids and grown-ups to get into nature and build a greener future
Chockful of ideas to get families, classrooms, and groups outside learning about nature, experiencing the world in new ways, and taking a hands-on approach to the three r’s (reduce, reuse, recycle). Chapters on being a green consumer and green eater, as well as on choosing an issue and taking a stand, make for a well-rounded yet easy-to-use handbook for making a difference indoors and out. Open to any page to find something to do today. The payoff is huge: Not only is nature just plain awesome to be in, research shows that spending time outdoors can actually improve our physical and emotional health.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=113572

Seven rules for sustainable communities : design strategies for the post-carbon world
pc_sevenrulesbook_coverNo other book so clearly connects the form of our cities to their ecological, economic, and social consequences. No other book takes on this breadth of complex and contentious issues and distills them down to such convincing and practical solutions. And no other book so vividly compares and contrasts the differing experiences of U.S. and Canadian cities. Of particular new importance is how city form affects the production of planet-warming greenhouse gases. The author explains this relationship in an accessible way, and goes on to show how conforming to seven simple rules for community design could literally do a world of good.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=114995

Red River College Library’s Sustainability Initiatives

April 16, 2014 • Written by

we recycleRed River College (RRC) has a growing reputation as one of Canada’s greenest employers, thanks especially to its Sustainability Initiatives: http://blogs.rrc.ca/redgreen/

As an integral part of the College, the Library is no exception and practices sustainability in its everyday operations, such as purchasing environmentally friendly products whenever possible for its own supplies. These include paper products with recycled content, refillable pens, Enviro-Stik pencils, and recycled paper clips.

And, the Library also goes beyond what is required.  How does RRC Library uniquely practice sustainability? By:

  • “Ever-greening” its collection; i.e. weeding to make room for new materials.  The old materials are not just thrown out to the landfill.  Far from it!  Once removed, they are made freely available for anyone to pick up from our freebie display.  Leftover items are picked up by the College’s Recycling team. 
  • Practicing responsible printing – by staff and students with a bias to “keep it green and leave it on the screen”.
  • Saving non-confidential photocopier/printer waste sheets that are blank on at least one side, for use as scrap paper by students and staff.
  • Responsible recycling or disposal of video tapes, batteries, electronic equipment, etc.
  • Inviting users to bring their own (ear)buds.   
  • Launching its recreational reading book exchange program.
  • Scrolling information on strategically placed screens for all to see instead of printing handouts.
  • Featuring green themes in its window display, such as the recent “Prepare for Spring!”
  • Creating curriculum-based, sustainability-related research guides, such as
  • Refreshing the air and milieu with plants – all provided by Library staff.
  • Undertaking a composting pilot project at its Exchange District Campus location that collected 157.5 lbs. by weight and 205 liters by volume, over one calendar year, Jan. 26/12 to Jan. 25/13.

For further information about greening libraries: