Visible Body – Anatomy & Physiology

April 17, 2018 • Written by

Red River College has obtained access to “Visible Body – Anatomy & Physiology”, a visually stunning, step-by-step introduction to each human body system from Wolters Kluwer.

RRC Staff and students may now use this resource, by connecting through the library web site. For instructions, please refer to our guide (link is below).

What does Visible Body provide?

“Visible Body – Anatomy & Physiology” provides a 3D introduction to the human body in 50 visual interactive chapters. Anatomy and physiology is presented in 3D model sets, animations, and illustrations.

Each unit presents a body system in a series of chapters, with bite-sized visual interactivities and quizzes. The site also features trackable unit objectives, with multiple-choice and dissection quizzes for assessing self-paced learning.

What units are included?

12 units are included: cells and tissues, integumentary, skeleton and joints, muscle types, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive

What are some of the features?

  • The user can view anatomy and physiology of all 12 body systems, and study the detail of the complex physiology by rotating, zooming and dissecting 3D models of bones, organs, and tissues.
  • The user can work through a bite-sized presentation of a concept, then use the self-assessment quizzes to assess mastery
  • The user can use study tools to reinforce and track learning

Would you lke to see a demo?

How do I connect to “Visible Body – Anatomy & Physiology”

RRC Staff and students should refer to our guide:
How to use and install Visible Body – Anatomy and Physiology.

Earth Day 2018: Sunday April 22

April 13, 2018 • Written by

Attribution: https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidstanleytravel/28255487842

The theme for this year’s Earth Day is End Plastic Pollution

From poisoning and injuring marine life to disrupting human hormones, from littering our beaches and landscapes to clogging our waste streams and landfills, the exponential growth of plastics is now threatening the survival of our planet.

In response, Earth Day 2018 is dedicated to providing the information and
inspiration needed to fundamentally change human attitude and behavior about plastics.

Click on the link to learn more and be part of the solution to plastic pollution: https://www.earthday.org/

Library Resources

The Red River College Library has a wide variety of materials related to recycling, as well as environmental issues, impact, and sustainability. We encourage our staff and students to search our online catalogue for more resources. In addition you can come check out our Earth Day window display at The Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed related print resources.

You may view a list of items in our window display here:
http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

Book JacketTrash talk : an encyclopedia of garbage and recycling around the world

As the popularity of sustainability grows and climate change becomes an accepted reality, experts point to trash and waste as the link between environmental and public health. This detailed reference—one of the most comprehensive resources available on the subject—examines garbage disposal on a global level, from the history of waste management, to the rise of green movements and recycling programs, to the environmental problems caused by incineration and overflowing landfills. According to urban planning scholar Robert William Collin, accounting for waste will improve the chances for environmental protection, public health, and sustainability.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=126501

 

Book JacketLean waste stream : reducing material use and garbage using lean principles

Waste, or garbage, is the manifestation of inefficiency. Therefore, by analyzing business garbage and tracing it back to its source, inefficiencies in process design and flow can be identified. This book approaches the specific problem of business garbage from a “Lean and green” perspective, connecting garbage reduction at all stages with lower operating expenses, higher productivity, and minimized landfill impact. It not only looks downstream at options for reusing, repurposing, and recycling, but also considers garbage in terms of transportation, inventory, and labor cost.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=124701

 

Book JacketElectronic waste : toxicology and public health issues

Discussing the major public health concerns due to the presence of toxic chemicals that are generated from improper recycling and disposal practices of electronic waste (e-waste). This book highlights hazardous inorganic chemicals found in e-waste, including arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, gallium, iridium, and nanomaterials, also focusing on health issues related to the presence of BPA, styrene, and other plastic components and combustion products, while also identifying populations at special risk. To provide readers with potential solutions to this global problem, Dr. Fowler presents risk assessment approaches using chemicals, mixtures, biomarkers, susceptibility factors, and computational toxicology. He discusses how to translate the information gathered through risk assessment into safe and effective international policies. This is a timely and useful resource for all those concerned with the health issues surrounding e-waste management and proper disposal, including toxicologists, public health and policy officials, environmental scientists, and risk assessors.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=131208

 

Book JacketUrban tree management : for the sustainable development of green cities

Urban tree management is the key to greener cities of the future. It is a practical discipline which includes tree selection, planting, care and protection, and the overall management of trees as a collective resource. Urban Tree Management aims to raise awareness for the positive impacts and benefits of city trees, and for their importance to city dwellers. It describes their advantages and details their effects on quality of urban life and well-being – aspects that are increasingly important in these times of progressing urbanization. With this book you will learn: fundamentals, methods and tools of urban tree management; state of the art in the fields of urban forestry and tree biology; positive effects and uses of urban trees; features, requirements and selection criteria for urban trees; conditions and problems of urban trees; governance and management aspects; environmental education programs. Edited by the leading expert, Dr Andreas Roloff, Urban Tree Management is an excellent resource for plant scientists, horticulturists, dendrologists, arborists and arboriculturists, forestry scientists, city planners, parks department specialists and landscape architects. It will be an essential addition to all students and libraries where such subjects are taught.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=127829

IBISWorld Industry Research Database

April 5, 2018 • Written by

The Red River College Library now subscribes to the “IBISWorld” industry research database.

Through this subscription, RRC patrons have access to 425 Canadian & 1,350 US industry research reports, covering:

  • Industry Performance
  • Forecasted Growth
  • Product & Customer Segmentation
  • Competition Levels
  • External Drivers
  • Major Companies
  • Operating Environment
  • Key Statistics

More specifically, this resource provides access to Canadian and US industry reports containing trends, market size, market share of major companies, industry statistics and financial ratios, competitive landscape and key external forces affecting supply and demand within the industry, and industry growth rates.

About this Industry

For example, a feature called “About this Industry” provides an outline of what the industry is and what it includes. It looks at the industry definition, supply chain, major players, main activities, similar industries, additional resources; and Jargon and Glossary. You can use this snapshot to quickly assess whether this industry report contains the information that you’re seeking.

Access to IBISWorld

RRC Patrons may find the IBISWorld access link in our A-Z list of Databases.

A Video Display for Earth Day

April 4, 2018 • Written by

April 22 is Earth Day, the world’s largest environmental movement. This is a dedicated time to celebrate the Earth and promote environmental awareness. In honour of Earth Day, AV Services at NDC Library has curated a selection of DVDs and streaming videos on environmental topics, which all staff and students at RRC may access or borrow.

View the list of Earth Day videos now on display >> Earth Day Video List

Questions or suggestions?

If you have any questions about AV materials, or you are an instructor and would like to suggest a purchase, please contact AV Services:

Notre Dame Campus

Phone: 204-632-2231
Email: av@rrc.ca

Exchange District Campus

Phone: 204-949-8370
Email: av_edc@rrc.ca

World Water Day 2018: Thursday, March 22

March 20, 2018 • Written by

World Water Day is an annual event celebrated on 22 March. The day focuses attention on the importance of universal access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene facilities in developing countries.

World Water Day 2018: Thursday, March 22

The theme for World Water Day 2018 is ‘Nature for Water’ – exploring nature-based solutions to the water challenges we face in the 21st century.

Damaged ecosystems affect the quantity and quality of water available for human consumption. Today, 2.1 billion people live without safe drinking water at home; affecting their health, education and livelihoods.

Sustainable Development Goal 6 commits the world to ensuring that everyone has access to safe water by 2030, and includes targets on protecting the natural environment and reducing pollution.

Reference: http://worldwaterday.org/

Library Resources

The Red River College Library maintains items related to “water” and “clean water access” in our collection; patrons are encouraged to search our online catalogue for resources. In addition, please check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed related resources.

You may view a list of items in our window display here:
http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.

 

Back to the well : rethinking the future of water

Water is a renewable resource, but what are its limits? Between drawing down our resources of fresh water at ever-increasing rates and continuing to pollute water that should have been cleaned up decades ago, are we entering upon a global crisis? Is water a human right? Who owns water? Who is responsible for keeping it clean and ensuring it gets to the people who need it most? Is privatization of ownership and supply networks an unmitigated evil? Marq de Villiers tackles these questions and more in Back to the Well, the refreshing follow-up to his Governor General’s Award winning book, Water (1999). De Villiers’s clear-eyed analysis assesses the state of water on Earth today and looks at the ways its use and abuse encompasses intersections between our daily personal water use, agriculture, energy policy, climate change, national security, and global conflicts. Back to the Well examines these issues and the ways they impact each other and how political ideologies and competing priorities often obscure underlying issues or make the best solutions unpalatable to vocal and influential, but ideologically blinkered, actors. De Villiers urges us to cut through the hype to see not a global crisis, but myriad local and regional problems that can be solved in different ways through local actions.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=126488

Blue future : protecting water for people and the planet forever

In her bestselling books Blue Gold and Blue Covenant, world-renowned water activist Maude Barlow exposed the battle for ownership of our dwindling water supply and the emergence of an international, grassroots-led movement to reclaim water as a public good. Since then, the United Nations has recognized access to water as a basic human right-but there is still much work to be done to stem this growing crisis. In this major new book, Barlow draws on her extensive experience and insight to lay out a set of key principles that show the way forward to what she calls a “water-secure and water-just world.” Not only does she reveal the powerful players even now impeding the recognition of the human right to water, she argues that water must not become a commodity to be bought and sold on the open market. Focusing on solutions, she includes stories of struggle and resistance from marginalized communities, as well as government policies that work for both people and the planet. At a time when climate change has moved to the top of the national agenda and when the stage is being set for unprecedented drought, mass starvation, and the migration of millions of refugees in search of water, Blue Future is an urgent call to preserve our most valuable resource for generations to come.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=121451

 

Boiling point : government neglect, corporate abuse, and Canada’s water crisis

We bask in the idea that Canada holds 20% of the world’s fresh water, confident that we will always have enough. Water crises face other countries, but not ours. We could not be more wrong. Maude Barlow lays bare the issues facing Canada’s water reserves, from long-outdated water laws to our unmapped and unprotected groundwater reserves, from agricultural pollution to industrial-waste dumping, from boil-water advisories to the effects of de-forestation and climate change. This will be the defining issue of the coming decade, and most of us have no idea that it is on our very own doorstep.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=129156

 

High and dry : meeting the challenges of the world’s growing dependence on groundwater

Groundwater is essential for drinking water and food security. It provides enormous environmental benefits by keeping streams and rivers flowing. But a growing global population, widespread use of industrial chemicals, and climate change threaten this vital resource. Groundwater depletion and contamination has spread from isolated areas to many countries throughout the world. In this accessible and timely book, hydrology expert William M. Alley and science writer Rosemarie Alley sound the call to protect groundwater. Drawing on examples from around the world, including case studies in the United States, Canada, Australia, India, and Sub-Saharan Africa, the authors examine groundwater from key scientific and socioeconomic perspectives. While addressing the serious nature of groundwater problems, the book includes stories of people who are making a difference in protecting this critical resource.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130719

 

Water in Canada : a resource in crisis

With a foreword by world-renowned water expert Dr. David Schindler, Water in Canada makes it crystal clear that the quantity and quality of our freshwater resources are diminishing at an alarming rate. Environmental journalist Hanneke Brooymans examines the effects of human activities on our water, and presents a thought-provoking analysis of our water issues.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=113117

 

 

 

International Women’s Day 2018 #PressforProgress

March 6, 2018 • Written by

International Women’s Day is coming. Let’s get ready. March 8, 2018

#PressforProgress

With the World Economic Forum’s 2017 Global Gender Gap Report findings telling us that gender parity is over 200 years away – there has never been a more important time to keep motivated and #PressforProgress. And with global activism for women’s equality fuelled by movements like #MeToo, #TimesUp and more – there is a strong global momentum striving for gender parity.

And while we know that gender parity won’t happen overnight, the good news is that across the world women are making positive gains day by day. Plus, there’s indeed a very strong and growing global movement of advocacy, activism and support.

So we can’t be complacent. Now, more than ever, there’s a strong call-to-action to press forward and progress gender parity. A strong call to #PressforProgress. A strong call to motivate and unite friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.

International Women’s Day is not country, group or organisation specific. The day belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. So together, let’s all be tenacious in accelerating gender parity. Collectively, let’s all Press for Progress.

Reference: https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Theme

 

RRC Library Resources

The Red River College Library maintains items related to “Gender Equality” and “Gender Parity” in our collection; patrons are encouraged to search our online catalogue for resources. In addition, please check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed related resources.

You may view a list of items in our window display here:
http://library.rrc.ca/Search/Window-Display.aspx

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.

 

Lean in : women, work, and the will to lead

Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In this book the author examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential. She is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune magazine’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=126441

 

Canadian women and the struggle for equality since 1867

The lives of girls and women have seen an astounding degree of transformation over the last 150 years. At the time of Confederation, females were not considered persons, legally or in many respects even socially. Today, while there is still a considerable distance to go, the opportunities available to women have grown exponentially. Lorna R. Marsden-sociologist, past Canadian senator, and activist-explores social change in Canada’s unique setting. The stories of how women seized opportunities to advance their status are both surprising and compelling, and reveal as much about Canada as a country as they do about the long road toward equality that women have travelled. Chapters provide absorbing insights into how change takes place over a range of topics, including the law, demographics, work, and social institutions; substantial advancement also took place in the wake of two world wars. Book jacket.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=118138

 

About Canada: Women’s rights

About Canada : women’s rights introduces readers to some of the many women who changed Canada through their efforts to secure greater equality. While a few are well known, many of these women and the battles they won have been forgotten. They deserve a greater place in Canada’s history.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=126362

 

 

Women and business since 1500 : invisible presences in Europe and North America?

This volume surveys the role women have played in various types of business as owners, co-owners and decision-making managers in European and North American societies since the sixteenth century. Drawing on up-to-date scholarship, it identifies the economic, social, legal and cultural factors that have facilitated or restricted women’s participation in business. It pays particular attention to the ways in which gender norms, and their evolution, shaped not only those women’s experience of business, but the ways they were perceived by contemporaries, documented in sources and, partly as a consequence, viewed by historians.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=127125

 

Making space for Indigenous feminism

The 2007 first edition of this book proposed that Indigenous feminism was a valid and indeed essential theoretical and activist position, and introduced a roster of important Indigenous feminist contributors. The book has been well received nationally and internationally. It has been deployed in Indigenous Studies, Law, Political Science, and Women and Gender Studies in universities and appears on a number of doctoral comprehensive exam reading lists. The second edition, Making More Space, builds on the success of its predecessor, but is not merely a reiteration of it. Some chapters from the first edition are largely revised. A majority of the chapters are new, written for the second edition by important new scholars and activists. The second edition is more confident and less diffident about making the case for Indigenous feminism and in deploying a feminist analysis. The chapters cover issues that are relevant to some of the most important issues facing Indigenous people–violence against women, recovery of Indigenous self-determination, racism, misogyny, and decolonisation. Specifically, new chapters deal with Indigenous resurgence, feminism amongst the Sami and in Aboriginal Australia, neoliberal restructuring in Oaxaca, Canada’s settler racism and sexism, and missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130795

International Women’s Day: Videos Now on Display

March 5, 2018 • Written by

Thursday, March 8, 2018 is International Women’s Day, an annual event celebrating women’s achievements and promoting gender equality.

AV Services, NDC Library, has put together a collection of videos that deal with a range of issues related to women. These videos are freely available to all staff and students at RRC. Come check out the display outside AV Services, or view some of our online selections below.

Available Online (log in required):

Gender Matters: A Virtual Discussion on Violence Against Women

As part of the Young Women’s National Leadership Summit, the YWCA and the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) invited participants aged 17+ from across North America to take part in a conversation with three outstanding role models and leaders in the fight for women’s rights. Focusing on the subject of gender-based violence, the panellists discussed the issues that women are facing today, and how we can work together to create a fairer and safer society for all. (2017 | 48 min)

 

 

The War at Home

Across Canada, a woman is killed every six days by her intimate partner. Another 3,000 flee their homes each night, seeking refuge in shelters. This must-see documentary offers an intimate look at a private battlefield, one where thousands of Canadian women live in fear in the one place they should feel safe – their homes. Warning: this program may contain mature subject matter and coarse language. Viewer discretion is advised. (2016 | 44 min)

Questions or suggestions?

If you have any questions about AV materials, or you are an instructor and would like to suggest a purchase, please contact AV Services:

Notre Dame Campus

Phone: 204-632-2231
Email: av@rrc.ca

Exchange District Campus

Phone: 204-949-8370
Email: av_edc@rrc.ca

 

Pink Shirt Day: Take a Stand on Bullying

February 26, 2018 • Written by

Check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed library resources related to bullying and Pink Shirt Day.

On February 28, 2018, we encourage everyone to practice kindness and wear pink to symbolize that you do not tolerate bullying.

Bullying is a major problem in our schools, workplaces, homes, and online. Over the month of February, and throughout the year, CKNW Kids’ Fund’s Pink Shirt Day aims to raise awareness of these issues, as well as raise funds to support programs that foster children’s healthy self-esteem.

Reference: https://www.pinkshirtday.ca/

How it began

Now a movement celebrated across the globe, Pink Shirt Day has humble beginnings. Inspired by an act of kindness in small-town Nova Scotia, CKNW Kids’ Fund, working with partners Boys & Girls Clubs and CKNW 980, was inspired to raise funds to support anti-bullying programs. Here is a snippet of an article detailing the original incident:

“David Shepherd, Travis Price and their teenage friends organized a high-school protest to wear pink in sympathy with a Grade 9 boy who was being bullied [for wearing a pink shirt]…[They] took a stand against bullying when they protested against the harassment of a new Grade 9 student by distributing pink T-shirts to all the boys in their school. ‘I learned that two people can come up with an idea, run with it, and it can do wonders,’ says Mr. Price, 17, who organized the pink protest. ‘Finally, someone stood up for a weaker kid.’ So Mr. Shepherd and some other headed off to a discount store and bought 50 pink tank tops. They sent out message to schoolmates that night, and the next morning they hauled the shirts to school in a plastic bag. As they stood in the foyer handing out the shirts, the bullied boy walked in. His face spoke volumes. ‘It looked like a huge weight was lifted off his shoulders,’ Mr. Price recalled. The bullies were never heard from again.” — GLOBE & MAIL

After David and Travis’ act of kindness in 2007, CKNW was inspired to help other youth affected by bullying, with many staff members wearing pink shirts and collecting funds to support Boys and Girls Clubs. Since then, the idea has only grown each year, with worldwide support and participation. Countries across the globe are now organizing anti-bullying fundraisers of their own, including Japan, New Zealand, China, Panama, and numerous others. In fact, last year alone, people in almost 180 countries shared their support of Pink Shirt Day through social media posts and donations.

Reference: https://www.pinkshirtday.ca/

Notre Dame Campus Window Display

Check out our window display at the Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed library resources related to bullying:

Below you will find a selection of the resources we have in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.

 

Am I safe here? : LGBTQ teens and bullying in schools

Every day, LGBTQ students ask this question within the school system. This book shines a light on the marginalization and bullying faced by LGBTQ youth, offering a new conceptualization of school safety. Donn Short treats students as the experts on what happens in their schools, giving them a chance to speak for themselves. They identify what it would take to make a school truly safe–insightfully explaining that safety doesn’t come merely from security cameras, ID tags, and dress codes, but from a culture that values equity and social justice.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130525

 

Cyberbullying through the new media : findings from an international network

Cyberbullying is one of the darker and more troubling aspects to the growing accessibility of new media technologies. Children in developed countries engage with cyberspace at younger and younger ages, and the use of the internet as a means to bully and harass has been greeted with alarm by educationalists, parents, the media, and governments. This important new book is the result of a four-year international collaboration, funded by the EU, to better understand how we can cope and confront cyberbullying, and how new media technologies can be used to actually support the victims of such abuse. The articles initially define the historical and theoretical context to cyberbullying, before examining key issues involved in managing this pervasive phenomenon.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=122454

 

I am not a slut : slut-shaming in the age of the Internet

Explores the phenomenon of slut-shaming in the age of sexting, tweeting, and “liking.” She shows that the sexual double standard is more dangerous than ever before and offers wisdom and strategies for alleviating its destructive effects on young women’s lives. Young women are encouraged to express themselves sexually. Yet when they do, they are derided as “sluts.” Caught in a double bind of mixed sexual messages, young women are confused. To fulfill the contradictory roles of being sexy but not slutty, they create an “experienced” identity on social media-even if they are not sexually active – while ironically referring to themselves and their friends as “sluts.” But this strategy can become a weapon used against young women in the hands of peers who circulate rumors and innuendo – elevating age-old slut-shaming to deadly levels, with suicide among bullied teenage girls becoming increasingly common.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=125517

 

Sticks and stones : defeating the culture of bullying and rediscovering the power of character and empathy

Being a teenager has never been easy, but in recent years, with the rise of the Internet and social media, it has become exponentially more challenging. Bullying, once thought of as the province of queen bees and goons, has taken on new, complex, and insidious forms.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=120318

 

Tilt your head, Rosie the red

Rosie is upset when her friend Fadimata is bullied because she wears a headscarf. But Rosie has learned that if you tilt your head even a little, you can see the world through someone else’s eyes. By thinking about things differently, Rosie comes up with a surprising plan to help her friend. Her solution proves that differences can be celebrated.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=125083

 

The drama years : real girls talk about surviving middle school — bullies, brands, body image, and more

An urgently needed and insightful guidebook for parents and teachers struggling to help girls navigate the often-difficult transition into adolescence by the founder of Girl Talk.It has never been easy to be a middle school girl. In the few short years between grade school and high school, girls go through an incredible number of physical and mental changes, making this the most formative–and precarious–time in their lives. Groups form and turn on each other; classmates whisper about who’s saying what to whom; childhood friends tell trusted secrets; and just deciding where to sit in the lunchroom can be a daily struggle.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=117377

Black History Month Videos Now on Display

February 1, 2018 • Written by

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of Black Canadians through history. They have helped make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation it is today. This compilation of videos, now on display at NDC Library, was created in their honour.

Black History in Canada Video List

Black Soul  Martine Chartrand’s animated short dives into the heart of Black culture with an exhilarating trip though history. Watch as a young boy traces his roots through the stories his grandmother shares with him about the events that shaped their cultural heritage.

Book of Negroes Based on the award-winning novel by Lawrence Hill, The Book of Negroes depicts the extraordinary life journey of Aminata Diallo, an indomitable African woman who cuts a swath through a world that is predisposed to underestimate her. Kidnapped by slave traders in West Africa and subsequently enslaved in South Carolina, Aminata must navigate her way through the American Revolution in New York, the isolated refuge given to Black Loyalists in Nova Scotia and the treacherous jungles of Sierra Leone, before ultimately securing her freedom in England at the dawn of the 19th century.

Brother 2 Brother An inspirational film about one man’s power to change; Corey Lucas is an African Canadian living in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. With a head full of dreams and empty pockets he turned to selling drugs on the street. Now as the father of a three-year old son, he tries to reconcile the life he knows with his desire to be a responsible father and a supporting partner. He experiences the transformative power of a weekend retreat for young Black males, organized by BROS (the Brothers Reaching Out Society). The story shows that despite all the odds against them young Black men can succeed if they have the will, the opportunity and the support of a community.

Deeply Rooted Filmmaker Cazhhmere is a seventh-generation black Canadian. Despite this deep history, she’s constantly asked to explain where she’s from — even though the answer is always “Canada.” Cazhhmere is a proud Canadian. Her ancestors were among the first black settlers to come to Canada — her family has spent hundreds of years weaving itself into the fabric of our nation. Despite this deep history, Cazhhmere is constantly questioned about where she is originally from. In Deeply Rooted, Cazhhmere will change your perception of what a multi-generational Canadian family looks like. In a country that is widely known for being a “global melting pot,” our nation can easily forget that not every person of colour is a newcomer to Canada.

Everybody’s Children Monika Delmos’s documentary captures a year in the life of two teenage refugees, Joyce and Sallieu, who have left their own countries to make a new life in Ontario. Joyce, 17, left the Democratic Republic of Congo to avoid being forced into prostitution by her family. Sallieu, 16, had witnessed the murder of his mother as a young boy in wartorn Sierra Leone.

Delmos follows them as they bear the normal pressures of being a teenager while simultaneously undergoing the refugee application process. She shows how the guidance and support of a handful of people make a real difference in the day-to-day lives of these children.

Invisible City The film is set in the inner-city housing project of Toronto’s Regent Park; Kendell and Mikey, like their surroundings are in the process of transformation; the environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices, their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed. Turning his camera on the often ignored inner city, Academy-award nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream.

Journey to Justice This documentary pays tribute to a group of Canadians who took racism to court. They are Canada’s unsung heroes in the fight for Black civil rights. Focusing on the 1930s to the 1950s, this film documents the struggle of 6 people who refused to accept inequality. Featured here, among others, are Viola Desmond, a woman who insisted on keeping her seat at a Halifax movie theatre in 1946 rather than moving to the section normally reserved for the city’s Black population, and Fred Christie, who took his case to the Supreme Court after being denied service at a Montreal tavern in 1936. These brave pioneers helped secure justice for all Canadians. Their stories deserve to be told.

Remember Africville This short film depicts Africville, a small black settlement that lay within the city limits of Halifax, Nova Scotia. In the 1960s, the families there were uprooted and their homes demolished in the name of urban renewal and integration. More than 20 years later, the site of the community of Africville is a stark, under-utilized park. Former residents, their descendants and some of the decision-makers speak out and, with the help of archival photographs and films, tell the story of that painful relocation.

The Skin We’re In Urgent, controversial and undeniably honest, The Skin We’re In is a wake-up call to complacent Canadians. Racism is here. It is everywhere. It is us and we are it. Following celebrated journalist Desmond Cole as he researches his hotly anticipated book, this documentary from acclaimed director Charles Officer pulls back the curtain on racism in Canada.

Speakers for the Dead This documentary reveals some of the hidden history of Blacks in Canada. In the 1930s in rural Ontario, a farmer buried the tombstones of a Black cemetery to make way for a potato patch. In the 1980s, descendants of the original settlers, Black and White, came together to restore the cemetery, but there were hidden truths no one wanted to discuss. Deep racial wounds were opened. Scenes of the cemetery excavation, interviews with residents and re-enactments—including one of a baseball game where a broken headstone is used for home plate—add to the film’s emotional intensity.

Wide Eyed  Ms. Jane Elliott, in all-white, all-Christian, Riceville, Iowa, involved her students in an exercise in discrimination based on eye-color. It was her attempt to help them to understand some of the reasons why Black people were taking to the streets and demanding equitable treatment with whites. Since then she has conducted the same exercise with people of all ages in cities all over the United States and in several other countries.

3 Ways to Stand Out at the Career Fair

January 17, 2018 • Written by

Getting ready for this year’s Career Fair (January 24 & 25, 2018) may seem like a daunting task. However, it doesn’t have to be. A few simple strategies can help open the door to new and exciting career opportunities. Below are some selected resources and tips to help you stand out to potential employers. (Note: log in is required to view electronic resources)

1. Boost Your Resume

Your resume is one of your most important assets, and it is wise to have an up-to-date version on hand. If you are starting from scratch, have a look at Same-day Resume: Write an Effective Resume in an Hour, which explains how to write a simple resume in about an hour (see Chapter 2). For examples of career-based resumes, check out Part 2 of Gallery of Best Resumes: A Collection of Quality Resumes by Professional Resume Writers. Also, Knock Em Dead Resumes: A Killer Resume Gets More Job Interviews includes easy-to-follow tips for giving your resume a boost.


2. Practice Promoting Yourself

Be prepared to promote yourself. First impressions have a powerful impact, and are set in “the first 10-30 seconds of meeting someone. Psychologists call this the Primacy Effect, and it is very hard to erase.” (From The Six Laws of Approachability: How to Break Down Barriers and Get People to Like You.) Laura Stack, in Self-promotion and Self-presentation Skills: Marketing Yourself for Success suggests practicing “doing a commercial for yourself. It should be 15-30 seconds, not long, just something that you have down pat for when someone asks you, “So, what do you do?“”


3. Dress for Success

What you wear matters a lot because it is the first thing people see about you, and first impressions are essential to standing out. “And your clothes say a lot about your judgment and level of professionalism—two extremely important criteria.” (From This Is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want – p. 182).

Video: Learn how to enhance your overall image >> When Presentation Counts: Grooming, Dressing & Body Language


Watch “Career Fair Prep” – Thurs, Jan 18 at 12:00

Strategies and Tips Career Fair Prep – Live Stream: Thursday, January 18 at 12:00 pm. Find out how to prepare for and what to expect at the RRC 2018 Career Fair on January 24 (NDC) and January 25 (EDC). Learn how to plan a strategy for the most effective and efficient use of your time, how to approach employers with an introduction that makes a good impression, and how to follow-up after the fair.