Summer Reading

June 14, 2017 • Written by

It’s summer and it’s time for a vacation! During your summer holidays, why not take some time for yourself and read one of the many excellent books available in Red River College’s Library.

We have placed a selection of books in the Notre Dame Campus window display. Check it out or view a complete list of all books in our display. If you see something you like, just come to the Notre Dame Campus Library and inquire at the Circulation Desk.

Here is a small sample of some of the recommended titles we have on display.

 

All that man is / David Szalay

Nine men. Each of them at a different stage in life, each of them away from home, and each of them striving–in the suburbs of Prague, in an overdeveloped Alpine village, beside a Belgian motorway, in a dingy Cyprus hotel–to understand what it means to be alive, here and now. Tracing a dramatic arc from the spring of youth to the winter of old age, the ostensibly separate narratives of All That Man Is aggregate into a picture of a single shared existence, a picture that interrogates the state of modern manhood while bringing to life, unforgettably, the physical and emotional terrain of an increasingly globalized Europe. And so these nine lives form an ingenious and new kind of novel, in which David Szalay expertly plots a dark predicament for the twenty-first-century man.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128518

 

Do not say we have nothing : a novel

An extraordinary novel set in China before, during and after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989–the breakout book we’ve been waiting for from a bestselling, Amazon.ca First Novel Award winner. Madeleine Thien’s new novel is breathtaking in scope and ambition even as it is hauntingly intimate. With the ease and skill of a master storyteller, Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations–those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution in the mid-twentieth century; and the children of the survivors, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square in 1989, in one of the most important political moments of the past century. With exquisite writing sharpened by a surprising vein of wit and sly humour, Thien has crafted unforgettable characters who are by turns flinty and headstrong, dreamy and tender, foolish and wise. At the centre of this epic tale, as capacious and mysterious as life itself, are enigmatic Sparrow, a genius composer who wishes desperately to create music yet can find truth only in silence; his mother and aunt, Big Mother Knife and Swirl, survivors with captivating singing voices and an unbreakable bond; Sparrow’s ethereal cousin Zhuli, daughter of Swirl and storyteller Wen the Dreamer, who as a child witnesses the denunciation of her parents and as a young woman becomes the target of denunciations herself; and headstrong, talented Kai, best friend of Sparrow and Zhuli, and a determinedly successful musician who is a virtuoso at masking his true self until the day he can hide no longer. Here, too, is Kai’s daughter, the ever-questioning mathematician Marie, who pieces together the tale of her fractured family in present-day Vancouver, seeking a fragile meaning in the layers of their collective story. With maturity and sophistication, humour and beauty, a huge heart and impressive understanding, Thien has crafted a novel that is at once beautifully intimate and grandly political, rooted in the details of daily life inside China, yet transcendent in its universality.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128504

 

Hot milk / Deborah Levy

“I have been sleuthing my mother’s symptoms for as long as I can remember. If I see myself as an unwilling detective with a desire for justice, is her illness an unsolved crime? If so, who is the villain and who is the victim? Sofia, a young anthropologist, has spent much of her life trying to solve the mystery of her mother’s unexplainable illness. She is frustrated with Rose and her constant complaints, but utterly relieved to be called to abandon her own disappointing fledgling adult life. She and her mother travel to the searing, arid coast of southern Spain to see a famous consultant– their very last chance– in the hope that he might cure her unpredictable limb paralysis. But Dr. Gomez has strange methods that seem to have little to do with physical medicine, and as the treatment progresses, Sofia’s mother’s illness becomes increasingly baffling. Sophia’s role as detective– tracking her mother’s symptoms in an attempt to find the secret motivation for her pain– deepens as she discovers her own desires in this transient desert community. Hot Milk is a profound exploration of the sting of sexuality, of unspoken female rage, of myth and modernity, the lure of hypochondria and big pharma, and, above all, the value of experimenting with life; of being curious, bewildered, and vitally alive to the world”–

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128498

 

The wonder / Emma Donoghue

An English nurse is brought to a small Irish village to observe what appears to be a miracle-a girl said to have survived without food for months-soon finds herself fighting to save the child’s life. Tourists flock to the cabin of eleven-year-old Anna O’Donnell, who believes herself to be living off manna from heaven, and a journalist is sent to cover the sensation. Lib Wright, a veteran of Florence Nightingale’s Crimean campaign, is hired to keep watch over the girl. Written with all the propulsive tension that made Room a huge bestseller, THE WONDER works beautifully on many levels–a tale of two strangers who transform each other’s lives, a powerful psychological thriller, and a story of love pitted against evil.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128483

 

The girl who drank the moon / Kelly Barnhill

Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster named Glerk and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, Fyrian. Xan rescues the abandoned children and delivers them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey. One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. Xan decides she must raise this enmagicked girl, whom she calls Luna, as her own. To keep young Luna safe from her own unwieldy power, Xan locks her magic deep inside her. When Luna approaches her thirteenth birthday, her magic begins to emerge on schedule — but Xan is far away. Meanwhile, a young man from the Protectorate is determined to free his people by killing the witch. Soon, it is up to Luna to protect those who have protected her — even if it means the end of the loving, safe world she’s always known.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=129203

 

Check out the complete list of all books in our display.

2nd Annual Mini-Golf Event: Photo Highlights

June 8, 2017 • Written by

Here are some photo highlights of our 2nd annual mini-golf tournament at Red River College Library, Notre Dame Campus. A big thank-you goes to Bettina Allen for planning the event and to all of the Library staff who volunteered to make it happen. It was great to see RRC staff and students having so much fun in the Library!

 

 

TEDx Winnipeg Live Stream – Tuesday 6 June 17 – Notre Dame Campus Library

June 1, 2017 • Written by

TEDxWinnipeg holds a one-day event each year in Winnipeg, MB. TED is all about spreading great ideas and we don’t want Red River College Staff and Students to miss out… which is why the library will be live-streaming this year’s TEDxWinnipeg!

  • When: Tuesday June 6 2017 – 8:30AM to 4:30PM
  • Where: Notre Dame Campus Library Classroom
  • Who: Students and Staff are welcome to drop in anytime between 8:30AM and 4:30PM.
  • Additional Info: Available on the TEDxWinnipeg website.

Tentative Programme of Speakers

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

  • DENE SINCLAIR Indigenous Tourism
  • MIKE LUND The Time of Your Life
  • JOHANNA HUME Design Economics
  • RYAN MAYBERRY The Future History of Art

10:00 – 10:45AM – Break

10:45AM – Noon

  • SONYA BALLANTYNE If I don’t see myself, how do I know I exist?
  • TATJANA BRKIC Social Innovation in Business
  • JON WALDMAN Swimming Aimlessly: Getting Men to Talk about Infertility
  • JOEL CARTER Storytelling at the End of Life

Noon – 1:30PM – Lunch Break

1:30PM – 2:45PM

  • ALI SAEED The Barefoot Man is Coming (Warning: Graphic images & Content)
  • RANA BOKHARI Leadership: Breaking Traditional Gender, Age, and Religious Barriers
  • MIKE JOHNSTON A Synonym for Science is Poetry

2:45PM – 3:15PM –  Break

3:15 – 4:30PM

  • ALYSON SHANE The Positive Power of Digital Communities
  • ANDREA KRAJ Smart Cities Begin With You
  • STEVE LANGSTON Goal Smashing

Come Play Mini-Putt Golf in the Library

May 30, 2017 • Written by

The Notre Dame Campus Library will be holding a mini-golf tournament on on Thursday 8 June 2017 from 11:00AM to 1:00PM. It takes about 15-20 minutes to play the course, no registration is necessary, equipment is provided, it’s free and no actual golf skills are required. Anyone who completes the course will be eligible to win a prize.

Where: Notre Dame Campus Library

When: 11:00AM to 1:00PM – Thursday 8 June 2017

Come and have some fun in the Library!

Canada 150 Collections on Curio

April 24, 2017 • Written by

A nation-wide celebration is currently under way as Canada turns 150. Staff at CBC have curated special collections of video and radio productions to commemorate Canada’s Sesquicentennial. What better way to celebrate than to watch and listen to quality Canadian programming on CBC’s Curio? (RRC network log in required)

CANADA 150 COLLECTIONS:

Canada 150: Contemporary Indigenous Voices

This collection focuses on cultural awareness, traditional knowledge and the contemporary challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples across Canada as we begin to explore reconciliation together.


Canada 150: Diversity and Inclusion

Our diversity as Canadians is one of our distinctive traits as a country. This collection examines the triumphs, lessons, struggles and challenges that continue to shape our multifaceted identity.


Canada 150: Innovation, Science and Technology

This collection focuses on Canadian contributions in science and technology, as well as accomplishments demonstrating our innovative spirit.


Canada 150: Key Events

Drawing on CBC’s archive of documentaries and news reports, this is a collection of big events throughout Canada’s first 150 years. Curio staff will keep adding to this collection as the year goes on. Let us know your suggestions!


Canada 150: Business and Economic Development

This collection presents some of the great moments that have marked the history of business in Canada and highlights some of the issues that have had a significant impact on the country’s economic development.


Canada 150: Immigration

Immigration is one of the central themes in Canadian history. While many came to Canada to pursue economic opportunity, others arrived because of an urgent need to flee persecution. Hear the diverse stories of the many who have come to Canada in search of a new home.


Canada 150: Icons

Putting together a list of Canadian icons is a big task, but CBC’s archives are deep and varied. This collection will keep growing as Canada’s 150th celebrations continue throughout 2017!


LEARN MORE:

Visit the Canada 150 website!

Earth Day – Saturday 22 April 2017

April 12, 2017 • Written by

Earth Day Network’s mission is to diversify, educate and activate the environmental movement worldwide. Growing out of the first Earth Day, Earth Day Network is the world’s largest recruiter to the environmental movement, working with more than 50,000 partners in nearly 200 countries to build environmental democracy. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world. We work through a combination of education, public policy, and consumer campaigns.

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, held in the USA, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement.

Reference: http://www.earthday.org/about/

 

Learn More: Books and videos from our collection

We have chosen items from the RRC library collection to help you to learn more about this topic. Most items require login.

The Man From Clear Lake : Earth Day Founder Senator Gaylord Nelson

On Earth Day 1970 twenty million Americans displayed their commitment to a clean environment. It was called the largest demonstration in human history, and it permanently changed the nation’s political agenda. More than 1 billion people now participate in annual Earth Day activities. The seemingly simple idea—a day set aside to focus on protecting our natural environment—was the brainchild of U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin. It accomplished, far beyond his expectations, his lifelong goal of putting the environment onto the nation’s and the world’s political agendas. The life of Nelson, a small-town boy who learned his values and progressive political principles at an early age, is woven through the political history of the twentieth century.

 

Beyond Earth Day : Fulfilling the Promise

Gaylord Nelson is known and respected throughout the world as a founding father of the modern environmental movement and creator of one of the most successful and influential public awareness campaigns ever undertaken on behalf of global stewardship: Earth Day. Now in his eighties, Nelson delivers a timely and urgent message with the same eloquence with which he has articulated the nation’s environmental ills through the decades. He details the planet’s most critical concerns—from species and habitat losses to global climate changes and population growth. In outlining his strategy for planetary health, he inspires citizens to reassert the environment as a top priority. A book for anyone who cares deeply about our environment and wants to know what we can and must do now to save it, Beyond Earth Day is a classic guide by one of the natural world’s great defenders.

1000 Days for the Planet

Biodiversity on our planet is in trouble. Plant and animal species are going extinct at a rate unprecedented in earth’s history. Some scientists believe that if nothing is done, between a third and half of all species on earth could disappear by the end of the century. The series 1000 Days for the Planet offers a troubling overview of the situation. Following the journey of the oceanographic schoonerSedna IVand its crew, the series captivates viewers with footage that is strikingly beautiful and spectacular, but also brutally hard to watch at times. Ultimately, however, the accounts of scientists engaged in a never-ending struggle to save our planet’s species make for a truly inspiring story for all citizens of the world.

Sustainability on campus : stories and strategies for change

These personal narratives of greening college campuses offer inspiration, motivation, and practical advice. Written by faculty, staff, administrators, and a student, from varying perspectives and reflecting divergent experiences, these stories also map the growing strength of a national movement toward environmental responsibility on campus. The authors of Sustainability on Campus report from a diverse group of institutions ranging from two-year community colleges to famous research universities. They tell of environmental stewardship on campus, curriculum changes, green building design, working with local communities, and system-wide initiatives.

 

Mother Earth

This short documentary is a celebration of life on planet Earth. Made from haunting visual images selected from 50 years of NFB productions, the film looks at human beings, their place on earth, and their deep interconnection with all other beings. Evocations of forces that threaten the planet and all its inhabitants also offer avenues for reflection. Musical score by Loreena McKennitt.

 

Great Googling

March 9, 2017 • Written by

Who doesn’t use a search engine? In fact, a search engine is statistically the first web page most people see when they go online. An average user is not a search expert and they likely use a search engine in its simplest form… just typing in a few search terms and going from there.

But, search engines can do much more than you might think!

In this blog post we have posted a handful of really cool tips that we just know you will love. Please note: In these instructions we are primarily referring to Google.  However, these tips will work in other search engines as well.

Let’s get started!

Searching an Explicit Phrase:

Lets say you are looking for content about the Winnipeg Jets.  Instead of just typing Winnipeg Jets into the Google search box, you will be better off searching explicitly for the phrase “Winnipeg Jets”.  To do this, simply enclose the search phrase inside quotation marks.

Search phrase: "Winnipeg Jets"           --> try it

Using a Wildcard within Quotes:

Lets say you are searching for a quote (or a song lyric) and you are not sure of one of the words. Replace the part you’re not sure of with the wildcard character (* – an asterisk). For example if you knew only part of a quote “Life is wasted on” from an unknown source or the lyric “Heard it from a friend” from an unknown song, you could use this search method to discover the source.

Search phrase: "Life is wasted on *"          --> try it

Search phrase: "Heard it from a friend *"      --> try it

Excluding Words

Lets say you want to search for info about the name Justin, but you want to exclude the results that may be included that have info about Justin Bieber. Simply use the minus (-) sign in front of a keyword you want to exclude from your search results.

Search phrase: Justin -Bieber        --> try it

A Site Specific Search

Often, you want to search a specific website for relevant content.  Even if the site doesn’t support a built-in search feature, you can use Google to search the site for your term. Simply use the “site:hostname.com” modifier.  For example, to search the tsn.ca website for information about the Winnipeg Jets:

Search phrase: Winnipeg Jets site:tsn.ca        --> try it

A Synonym Search

Let’s say you want to include a word in your search, but you also wish to include results that contain similar words or synonyms.  To do this, use the tilde (~) character in front of the word. For example, you could search for “Winnipeg Jobs” and then also search for “Winnipeg Employment” and get two different results.  However if you search for “Winnipeg ~employment” you should get all results for Winnipeg and all synonyms of employment included.

Search phrase: winnipeg ~employment         --> try it

Searching for a Specific Document Type

Performing a Filetype Specific Search

Performing a Filetype Specific Search

If you’re looking to find results that are of a specific type, you can use the modifier “filetype:”.  For example, you might want to find only PDF files related to the Red River College:

Search phrase: Red River College filetype:pdf        --> try it

Searching for This OR That

By default, when you do a search, Google will include all the terms specified in the search.  If you are looking for any one of one or more terms to match, then you can use the OR operator.  Please note that the OR has to be capitalized.

Search phrase: "winnipeg jets" OR "manitoba moose"         --> try it

Conclusion

There are dozens of tips which can be used with Google, but this is all for now!  We will post more in a future blog entry.

Simple Stress Soothers

March 8, 2017 • Written by

Are you overwhelmed? …Worried? …Run down?

Here are some quick and easy solutions to help you counteract the stress in your life. These are borrowed from Deborah Davis’s book, Adult learner’s companion (pages 28, 29), available at Red River College Library.

⇒ Take deep breaths

Deep breathing calms you and helps you think more clearly.

Look further: Stress Management: Breathing Exercises for Relaxation

⇒ Think before you speak

Listening and thinking before speaking allows you to respond to others calmly and appropriately, which results in better feelings all around.

Look further: Think Before you Speak (3 min video)

Find some physical activity

Any form of exercise is a stress-reliever. Even a ten-minute walk during break is beneficial. Exercise also tires you and helps you sleep better.

Look further: Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress

Make a date

Connect with others, get out of yourself and have a few laughs.

Eat slowly

It is better for digestion, you will enjoy your food more, and it may help you lose weight.

Look further: Top Ten Mindful Eating Apps

Turn off the TV

Some people use TV to zone out, as a way to avoid dealing with their stress. This may make you feel better temporarily, but in the long run it actually adds to your stress.

Eat stress-reducing foods

The right foods have the power to calm you, lower stress hormones, build up the immune system, and lower blood pressure. Sunflower seeds and oatmeal are among foods that can help fight stress.

Look further: How to Eat Right to Reduce Stress

Change your perception

Changing how you look at something can completely change your experience of it. Taking control of your thoughts is a powerful stress reliever.

Look further: The Art of Thinking Differently


More on Stress:

For more information on stress management and other resources at RRC Library, stop by the Library desk or contact our reference staff at:

 

 

Music: Mind Medicine and More

March 2, 2017 • Written by

Music has long been recognized for its ability to trigger memories. Dr. Anne Fabiny says, “Some people, who had seemed unable to speak, proceed to sing and dance to the music, and others are able to recount when and where they had listened to that music. The music seems to open doors to the residents’ memory vaults” (Source: Music can boost memory and mood, Harvard Women’s Health Watch. Mar2015, Vol. 22 Issue 7, p7-7. 2/3p.).

Alive Inside: Music Reawakens Souls

Alive Inside is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music.

View the trailer here:

To view the full video, click here: Alive Inside (RRC network log in required)

Music for Motor Skills and Pain

Music and dance have been used to improve movements and motor skills in patients with Parkinson’s for years. One such patient, Larry Jennings, would be debilitated by Parkinson’s at one moment, and dancing and singing to music at the next. View the transformation on CTV News here: ‘Instantaneous results’: How music transformed a man with Parkinson’s.

Not only does music trigger memories and improve motor skills, “Listening to music is known to raise people’s pain thresholds, so much so that in some cases, it can be used to reduce the need for morphine-like painkillers,” says Penny Sarchet in Brain on music kills pain of workouts (New Scientist. 8/8/2015, Vol. 227 Issue 3033, p10-10. 1p. 1). Listening to music can also reduce the perceived amount of effort in exercise, can enhance mood and impact our immune system.

An Investigation by The Nature of Things

I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song (RRC network log in required) is an episode of The Nature of Things which investigates the effects of music on human beings: “Why do we sing? Are we hardwired for melodies? Scientists and musicians explore the many ways that music profoundly affects the human body, the brain and human emotions. It’s one of the oldest forms of communication, and like language, music seems an essential tool employed by humans for multiple needs.” (Source: Curio.ca)

More on How Music Benefits the Brain:

Changes to Student Email coming in March

March 1, 2017 • Written by

During the month of March, Red River College IT Solutions will be moving into the next phase of enhancements to the Student Email system, moving Student Mailboxes to Office 365 in the Cloud.

Students will access the Student Email service in the same manner that they have in the past, by using HUB, and will have the additional benefit of mobile access on their phones or tablets using Microsoft’s Apps.  Student Email using Office 365 will have a similar look and feel to the existing Student Email system, with slight changes in colours and enhanced features.  The email addresses for all students will continue to use the “username@academic.rrc.ca” format, allowing for a smooth transition into the new system and ensuring that communication from Faculty and Staff will continue to flow without issue.

Students will be notified by email of the upcoming change through an All Student email.  Additionally, students will receive an email from ITS on the day prior to their mailbox moving to make them aware of the imminent change.  No action is required by the students for this change to occur.

For further information and help please refer to:
http://blogs.rrc.ca/its/help-resources/