Great Googling

March 9, 2017 • Written by

Who doesn’t use a search engine? In fact, a search engine is statistically the first web page most people see when they go online. An average user is not a search expert and they likely use a search engine in its simplest form… just typing in a few search terms and going from there.

But, search engines can do much more than you might think!

In this blog post we have posted a handful of really cool tips that we just know you will love. Please note: In these instructions we are primarily referring to Google.  However, these tips will work in other search engines as well.

Let’s get started!

Searching an Explicit Phrase:

Lets say you are looking for content about the Winnipeg Jets.  Instead of just typing Winnipeg Jets into the Google search box, you will be better off searching explicitly for the phrase “Winnipeg Jets”.  To do this, simply enclose the search phrase inside quotation marks.

Search phrase: "Winnipeg Jets"           --> try it

Using a Wildcard within Quotes:

Lets say you are searching for a quote (or a song lyric) and you are not sure of one of the words. Replace the part you’re not sure of with the wildcard character (* – an asterisk). For example if you knew only part of a quote “Life is wasted on” from an unknown source or the lyric “Heard it from a friend” from an unknown song, you could use this search method to discover the source.

Search phrase: "Life is wasted on *"          --> try it

Search phrase: "Heard it from a friend *"      --> try it

Excluding Words

Lets say you want to search for info about the name Justin, but you want to exclude the results that may be included that have info about Justin Bieber. Simply use the minus (-) sign in front of a keyword you want to exclude from your search results.

Search phrase: Justin -Bieber        --> try it

A Site Specific Search

Often, you want to search a specific website for relevant content.  Even if the site doesn’t support a built-in search feature, you can use Google to search the site for your term. Simply use the “site:hostname.com” modifier.  For example, to search the tsn.ca website for information about the Winnipeg Jets:

Search phrase: Winnipeg Jets site:tsn.ca        --> try it

A Synonym Search

Let’s say you want to include a word in your search, but you also wish to include results that contain similar words or synonyms.  To do this, use the tilde (~) character in front of the word. For example, you could search for “Winnipeg Jobs” and then also search for “Winnipeg Employment” and get two different results.  However if you search for “Winnipeg ~employment” you should get all results for Winnipeg and all synonyms of employment included.

Search phrase: winnipeg ~employment         --> try it

Searching for a Specific Document Type

Performing a Filetype Specific Search

Performing a Filetype Specific Search

If you’re looking to find results that are of a specific type, you can use the modifier “filetype:”.  For example, you might want to find only PDF files related to the Red River College:

Search phrase: Red River College filetype:pdf        --> try it

Searching for This OR That

By default, when you do a search, Google will include all the terms specified in the search.  If you are looking for any one of one or more terms to match, then you can use the OR operator.  Please note that the OR has to be capitalized.

Search phrase: "winnipeg jets" OR "manitoba moose"         --> try it

Conclusion

There are dozens of tips which can be used with Google, but this is all for now!  We will post more in a future blog entry.

Simple Stress Soothers

March 8, 2017 • Written by

Are you overwhelmed? …Worried? …Run down?

Here are some quick and easy solutions to help you counteract the stress in your life. These are borrowed from Deborah Davis’s book, Adult learner’s companion (pages 28, 29), available at Red River College Library.

⇒ Take deep breaths

Deep breathing calms you and helps you think more clearly.

Look further: Stress Management: Breathing Exercises for Relaxation

⇒ Think before you speak

Listening and thinking before speaking allows you to respond to others calmly and appropriately, which results in better feelings all around.

Look further: Think Before you Speak (3 min video)

Find some physical activity

Any form of exercise is a stress-reliever. Even a ten-minute walk during break is beneficial. Exercise also tires you and helps you sleep better.

Look further: Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress

Make a date

Connect with others, get out of yourself and have a few laughs.

Eat slowly

It is better for digestion, you will enjoy your food more, and it may help you lose weight.

Look further: Top Ten Mindful Eating Apps

Turn off the TV

Some people use TV to zone out, as a way to avoid dealing with their stress. This may make you feel better temporarily, but in the long run it actually adds to your stress.

Eat stress-reducing foods

The right foods have the power to calm you, lower stress hormones, build up the immune system, and lower blood pressure. Sunflower seeds and oatmeal are among foods that can help fight stress.

Look further: How to Eat Right to Reduce Stress

Change your perception

Changing how you look at something can completely change your experience of it. Taking control of your thoughts is a powerful stress reliever.

Look further: The Art of Thinking Differently


More on Stress:

For more information on stress management and other resources at RRC Library, stop by the Library desk or contact our reference staff at:

 

 

Music: Mind Medicine and More

March 2, 2017 • Written by

Music has long been recognized for its ability to trigger memories. Dr. Anne Fabiny says, “Some people, who had seemed unable to speak, proceed to sing and dance to the music, and others are able to recount when and where they had listened to that music. The music seems to open doors to the residents’ memory vaults” (Source: Music can boost memory and mood, Harvard Women’s Health Watch. Mar2015, Vol. 22 Issue 7, p7-7. 2/3p.).

Alive Inside: Music Reawakens Souls

Alive Inside is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music.

View the trailer here:

To view the full video, click here: Alive Inside (RRC network log in required)

Music for Motor Skills and Pain

Music and dance have been used to improve movements and motor skills in patients with Parkinson’s for years. One such patient, Larry Jennings, would be debilitated by Parkinson’s at one moment, and dancing and singing to music at the next. View the transformation on CTV News here: ‘Instantaneous results’: How music transformed a man with Parkinson’s.

Not only does music trigger memories and improve motor skills, “Listening to music is known to raise people’s pain thresholds, so much so that in some cases, it can be used to reduce the need for morphine-like painkillers,” says Penny Sarchet in Brain on music kills pain of workouts (New Scientist. 8/8/2015, Vol. 227 Issue 3033, p10-10. 1p. 1). Listening to music can also reduce the perceived amount of effort in exercise, can enhance mood and impact our immune system.

An Investigation by The Nature of Things

I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song (RRC network log in required) is an episode of The Nature of Things which investigates the effects of music on human beings: “Why do we sing? Are we hardwired for melodies? Scientists and musicians explore the many ways that music profoundly affects the human body, the brain and human emotions. It’s one of the oldest forms of communication, and like language, music seems an essential tool employed by humans for multiple needs.” (Source: Curio.ca)

More on How Music Benefits the Brain:

Changes to Student Email coming in March

March 1, 2017 • Written by

During the month of March, Red River College IT Solutions will be moving into the next phase of enhancements to the Student Email system, moving Student Mailboxes to Office 365 in the Cloud.

Students will access the Student Email service in the same manner that they have in the past, by using HUB, and will have the additional benefit of mobile access on their phones or tablets using Microsoft’s Apps.  Student Email using Office 365 will have a similar look and feel to the existing Student Email system, with slight changes in colours and enhanced features.  The email addresses for all students will continue to use the “username@academic.rrc.ca” format, allowing for a smooth transition into the new system and ensuring that communication from Faculty and Staff will continue to flow without issue.

Students will be notified by email of the upcoming change through an All Student email.  Additionally, students will receive an email from ITS on the day prior to their mailbox moving to make them aware of the imminent change.  No action is required by the students for this change to occur.

For further information and help please refer to:
http://blogs.rrc.ca/its/help-resources/

Louis Riel Day – February 20th

February 15, 2017 • Written by

Since this Monday is Louis Riel Day, we’d like to take a moment to encapsulate some of the important resources available to our patrons regarding one of Manitoba’s most controversial historical figures.

Who was Louis Riel?

Louis Riel, a leader of his people in their resistance against the Canadian government in the Canadian Northwest, is perhaps the most controversial figure in Canadian historiography. His life and deeds have spawned a massive and diverse literature.

He was born in the Red River Settlement (in what is now Manitoba) in 1844. A promising student, he was sent to Montreal to train for the priesthood, but he never graduated. An attempt at training as a lawyer ended similarly, and by 1868 Riel was back in the Red River area. Ambitious, well educated and bilingual, Riel quickly emerged as a leader among the Métis of the Red River.

Read More: http://library.usask.ca/northwest/background/riel.htm

Why Commemorate Louis Riel?

Louis Riel is recognized as an advocate of justice for the Métis people, but he represents much more. He helped lay the framework for minority rights and cultural co-operation, and is regarded as a founder of Manitoba. It is very important to remember Louis Riel’s contribution to Canada and specifically to recall that he was executed for being a persistent advocate for the rights of his people. (Reference: http://louisrielday.com/)

In 2008, Manitoba schools were invited to name our province’s newest holiday and 114 responded with suggestions that reflected Manitoba’s citizenship, history, culture, arts, sports and significant individuals from our past. Eleven schools submitted the winning entry and received $1,000 grants to purchase materials for their school library. (Reference: http://louisrielday.com/louis-riel-day-origins/)

Louis Riel Books and Videos

The Red River College Library has dozens of “Louis Riel” related items in our collection. Here is a sample:

Riel’s Defence : Perspectives on His Speeches (eBook)
In 1885, Louis Riel was charged with high treason, found guilty, and consequently executed for his role in Saskatchewan’s North-West Rebellion. During his trial, the Métis leader gave two speeches, passionately defending the interests of the Métis in western Canada as well as his own life. Riel’s Defence studies these speeches, demonstrating the range of Riel’s political and personal concerns. Link: EBSCOhost eBook

Louis Riel and Gabriel Dumont
Louis Riel, a controversial Metis mystic and visionary, fought for his people’s rights against an encroaching tide of white settlers. Hunter and Metis leader Gabriel Dumont, a man tested by warfare, was, in contrast, a pragmatic realist of the land. Celebrated novelist Joseph Boyden explores the tumultuous year when Riel and Dumont united the Me´tis while dividing a nation. Could Dumont have forseen the impact on the Me´tis cause when he brought Riel home? While making rational demands of Sir John A. Macdonald, Riel seemed increasingly overtaken by a messianic mission. His controversial execution by the Canadian government in 1885 still reverberates today. Catalog Record: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=112056

Louis Riel : firebrand
Louis Riel devoted his life to the Metis cause. A fiery activist, he struggled against injustice as he saw it. He was a pioneer in the field of Aboriginal rights and land claims but was branded an outlaw in his own time. In 1885, he was executed for treason. In 1992, the House of Commons declared Riel a founder of Manitoba. November 16 is now designated Louis Riel Day in Canada. Catalog Record: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100518

Louis Riel : a comic-strip biography
Told with dispassionate precision by the legendary cartoonist Chester Brown, this is the story of the charismatic, and perhaps mad, nineteenth century Metis leader, whose struggle to win rights for his people led to violent rebellion on the Canadian frontier. Catalog Record: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=87977

Louis Riel
Champion of a people or traitorous rabble-rouser? Political visionary or religious lunatic? Louis Riel is one of the most ambiguous figures in Canadian history, a man who stood and fell for the Métis nation. Read about the fascinating western icon in this well-paced biography. The doomed struggle of Louis Riel and his Métis people against the new Canadian government is a story rich in drama and cultural change. Catalog Record: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=86278

Riel (Video)
1979 Dramatization of the Riel Rebellion of 1885. Under their leader, Louis Riel, the Metis rise up against the government of Sir John A. MacDonald. Stars Raymond Cloutier as Louis Riel. Also includes Roger Blay, Maury Chaykin, Arthur Hill, Leslie Nielsen, Christopher Plummer and William Shatner in supporting roles.Catalog Record: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=32674

Louis Riel Quotes

“We must cherish our inheritance. We must preserve our nationality for the youth of our future. The story should be written down to pass on.” – Louis Riel

“I am more convinced everyday that without a single exception I did right. And I have always believed that, as I have acted honestly, the time will come when the people of Canada will see and acknowledge it.” – Louis Riel, 1885

“Yes, I have done my duty. During my life I have aimed at practical results. I hope that after my death my spirit will bring practical results. All that I have done and risked… Rested certainly on the conviction that I was called upon to do something for my country I know that through the grace of God I am the founder of Manitoba.” – Louis Riel, May 6, 1885, Batoche, N.W.T.

Reference: http://www.mmf.mb.ca/louis_riel_quotes.php

Louis Riel’s grave-site, located next to the St. Boniface Basilica.

Louis Riel Tour

Are you looking for a long-weekend activity? Here is a wonderful web page that lists the Louis Riel commemorative locations in and around Winnipeg: http://louisrielday.com/louis-riel-tour/

 

 

 

 

 

Viola Desmond: A Story of Courage

February 13, 2017 • Written by

In February 2008, Senator Donald Oliver, the first Black man appointed to the Senate, introduced the Motion to Recognize Contributions of Black Canadians and February as Black History Month. It received unanimous approval and was adopted on March 4, 2008. Since then, February is an official time to celebrate Black Canadians – their experiences, stories, achievements and contributions.

Learn more: Government of Canada – Black History Month

VIOLA DESMOND (1914-1965):
Entrepreneur and Defender of Social Justice

The 2017 Black History Month poster (pictured right) shows Viola Desmond as an example of the courage and strength shown by so many Black Canadians throughout history.

Watch, listen and read about how Viola Desmond and other Black Canadians have taken a stand against racial segregation in Canada.

 


Heritage Minutes: Viola Desmond (Historica Canada video)

The story of Viola Desmond, an entrepreneur who challenged segregation in Nova Scotia in the 1940s. The 82nd Heritage Minute in Historica Canada’s collection. (1 min.)


Living in Hope: Viola Desmond’s Story (CBC Radio broadcast)

A dramatized account of a pivotal moment in Canadian race relations. On November 8, 1946 Viola Desmond refuses to move to the upstairs balcony in the Roseland Theatre, and is forcibly removed from the theatre and thrown in jail. The resulting legal battle was taken all the way to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. (RRC network log in required)


Viola Desmond’s Canada : a history of Blacks and racial segregation in the promised land (Book)

Most Canadians are aware of Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated bus in Alabama, but Viola Desmond’s act of resistance occurred nine years earlier. However, many Canadians are still unaware of Desmond’s story or that racial segregation existed throughout many parts of Canada during most of the twentieth century. On the subject of race, Canadians seem to exhibit a form of collective amnesia. Viola Desmond’s Canada is a groundbreaking book that provides a concise overview of the narrative of the Black experience in Canada. (Available to borrow from RRC Library)

 


Journey to Justice (NFB video)

Click the image to view the movie on the National Film Board website.

 

“This documentary pays tribute to a group of Canadians who took racism to court. They are Canada’s unsung heroes in the fight for Black civil rights. Focusing on the 1930s to the 1950s, this film documents the struggle of 6 people who refused to accept inequality. Featured here, among others, are Viola Desmond, a woman who insisted on keeping her seat at a Halifax movie theatre in 1946 rather than moving to the section normally reserved for the city’s Black population, and Fred Christie, who took his case to the Supreme Court after being denied service at a Montreal tavern in 1936. These brave pioneers helped secure justice for all Canadians. Their stories deserve to be told.” – NFB website

 

CBC News in Review: January 2017 Edition

January 31, 2017 • Written by

Here is a round-up of the latest edition of CBC News in Review – a closer look at current events. (RRC network log in required to view.)

Europe’s Discontent: The Backlash of Populism

“The results of the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom and the U.S. presidential election in 2016 may have caught many by surprise, but those who study political philosophy say it’s all part of an anti-establishment backlash. It indicates a return to so-called “populism,” where the people want more say in the direction of their country. And that could spell major changes for the leaders of many European nations in the near future.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Revealing Selfies: The Consequences of Sexting

“Sharing a sexy selfie with your latest crush may seem harmless, but once online those images live forever. Recently six male teens found out the hard way that sharing intimate pictures of their female schoolmates was also against the law. CBC reporter Ioanna Roumeliotis went to a high school in Nova Scotia to talk to teens about the pressure to share those intimate photos, and steps being taken to help kids understand the consequences.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Fidel Castro: Brutal Dictator or Visionary Revolutionist?

“The death of Fidel Castro in late November 2016 had Cubans mourning while expats were celebrating. He was a polarizing figure, larger than life and an enigma. He’s been a long-time friend of Canada thanks to a friendship with former prime minister Pierre Trudeau, and an arch enemy of America — at least until former U.S. president Barack Obama tried to end that Cold War. Now incoming President Donald Trump will likely end any agreements made and Cuba’s future is uncertain once again.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

Disinformation and Lies: The Dangers of Fake News

“When a man walked into a New York pizza parlour in December 2016 with an assault rifle and said he was checking out the story that there was a child sex-trafficking ring in the basement, run by former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, the world took notice. It was a fake news story called “Pizzagate”, planted online, that went viral. Now it’s getting harder to tell truth from fiction on the Internet. But why has “fake news” spiked?  Some say it’s because there’s money to be made. Others say it’s foreign countries trying to manipulate the outcome of important events such as the U.S. presidential election. Whatever the case, “fake news” has gone viral.” — CBC News in Review, Current Edition on Curio.ca

NFB presents… Award-winning Animation

January 23, 2017 • Written by

The National Film Board of Canada (NFB)—Canada’s public film producer and distributor—has achieved global recognition for delivering innovative and highly creative media productions. Much of the NFB’s output is serious in nature, however a lighter side is revealed in their fantastically creative, highly entertaining animated shorts. I’m sure the students learning animation in RRC’s Digital Media Design program would find inspiration in this award-winning animation (please note that RRC network log in is required to view).

Me and My Moulton

Torill Kove, National Film Board of Canada

“This animated short by Torill Kove marks the NFB’s 73rd Oscar® nomination! With a bright palette and witty dialogue, the film tells the charming story of a seven-year-old girl and her sisters, who ask for a bicycle knowing full well that their loving yet unconventional parents will likely disappoint them.”—NFB website. Winner of 2 awards and 3 nominations.


Ryan

Chris Landreth, National Film Board of Canada

“This Oscar®-winning animated short from Chris Landreth is based on the life of Ryan Larkin, a Canadian animator who produced some of the most influential animated films of his time. Ryan is living every artist’s worst nightmare – succumbing to addiction, panhandling on the streets to make ends meet. Through computer-generated characters, Landreth interviews his friend to shed light on his downward spiral. Some strong language. Viewer discretion is advised.”—NFB website. Winner of 27 awards and 2 nominations.


Gloria Victoria

Theodore Ushev, National Film Board of Canada

“Recycling elements of surrealism and cubism, this animated short by Theodore Ushev focuses on the relationship between art and war. Propelled by the exalting “invasion” theme from Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony (No. 7), the film presents imagery of combat fronts and massacres, leading us from Dresden to Guernica, from the Spanish Civil War to Star Wars. It is at once a symphony that serves the war machine, that stirs the masses, and art that mourns the dead, voices its outrage and calls for peace.”—NFB website. Winner of 1 award and 7 nominations.


Madame Tutli-Putli

Chris Lavis & Maciek Szczerbowski, National Film Board of Canada

“This stop-motion animated film takes viewers on an exhilarating existential journey into the fully imagined, tactile world of Madame Tutli-Putli. As she travels alone on the night train, weighed down with all her earthly possessions and the ghosts of her past, she faces both the kindness and menace of strangers. Finding herself caught up in a desperate metaphysical adventure, adrift between real and imagined worlds, Madame Tutli-Putli confronts her demons.”—NFB website. Winner of 12 awards and 6 nominations.


The Danish Poet

Torill Kove, National Film Board of Canada

“This Oscar®-winning short animation follows Kasper, a poet whose creative well has run dry, on a holiday to Norway to meet the famous writer Sigrid Undset. Kasper attempts to answer some pretty big questions: can we trace the chain of events that leads to our own birth? Is our existence just coincidence? Do little things matter? As Kasper’s quest for inspiration unfolds, it appears that a spell of bad weather, an angry dog, slippery barn planks, a careless postman, hungry goats and other seemingly unrelated factors might play important roles in the big scheme of things after all.”—NFB website. Winner of  9 awards and 2 nominations.


Bob’s Birthday

David Fine & Alison Snowden, National Film Board of Canada

“This film took home an Oscar® for Best Animated Short Film. When Margaret plans a celebration for her husband Bob, she underestimates the sudden impact of middle age on his mood. A witty, offbeat animated portrait of a frustrated dentist wrestling with the fundamental issues of life proves that birthdays (and surprise parties) can be very tricky indeed.”—NFB website. Winner of 3 awards and 3 nominations.


The Big Snit

Richard Condie, National Film Board of Canada

“This poignant and hilarious animated film perfectly captures the intersection of a domestic quarrel and a global nuclear war. An Oscar® nominee enjoyed by millions of fans, this film is a classic example of Richard Condie’s off-the-wall humour.”—NFB website. Winner of 4 awards and 3 nominations.


LOOK FURTHER:
⇒ Explore NFB’s animation collection
⇒ See a sample of students’ work in the Digital Media Design and 3D Computer Graphics programs at RRC:

 

 

Prime Cuts: Books About Meat

January 18, 2017 • Written by

Last week, Jill Wilson wrote about a renewed interest in butchers and locally-sourced meats in a Free Press article entitled Riving an Art. In addition to talking to butchers from the newly opened Bouchée Boucher and established businesses like Denny’s Meats, the college’s Culinary Arts gets mentioned for expanding their repertoire by using whole animals in meat cutting courses, plus a brand-new second year course.

As usual, the library continues to support this, and other programs, with our collection. Below are selected titles from our collection yet these ‘prime cuts’ represent a fraction of culinary titles with topics already profiled in past posts. (What can we say, we like food as much as books.)

Books

 

 

Butcher’s Apprentice: The Expert’s Guide to Selecting, Preparing, and Cooking a World Of Meat
Authors: Eliza Green and Steve Lagado (Illustrator)

 

The masters in The Butcher’s Apprentice teach you all the old-world, classic meat-cutting skills you need to prepare fresh cuts at home. Through extensive, diverse profiles and cutting lessons, butchers, food advocates, meat-loving chefs, and more share their expertise. Inside, you’ll find hundreds of full-color, detailed step-by-step photographs of cutting beef, pork, poultry, game, goat, organs, and more, as well as tips and techniques on using the whole beast for true nose-to-tail eating.–From the Online Catalog


Eat This Book: A Carnivore’s Manifesto

Author: Dominque Lestel

If we want to improve the treatment of animals, Dominique Lestel argues, we must acknowledge our evolutionary impulse to eat them and we must expand our worldview to see how others consume meat ethically and sustainably.–From the book jacket

 

 

 


Meat: Everything You Need To Know

Author: Pat LaFrieda

Pat LaFrieda, the third generation butcher, and owner of America’s premier meatpacking business presents the ultimate book of everything meat, with more than seventy-five mouthwatering recipes for beef, pork, lamb, veal, and poultry.For true meat lovers, a beautifully prepared cut of beef, pork, lamb, veal, or poultry is not just the center of the meal, it is the reason for eating.–From the Simon and Shuster Website

 

Meat: Identification, Fabrication, Utilization
Author: Thomas Schneller

Kitchen Pro Series: Guide to Meat Identification, Fabrication, and Utilization is the definitive guide to purchasing and fabricating meat cuts for professional chefs, foodservice personnel, culinarians, and food enthusiasts. Part of the CIA’s new Kitchen Pro Series focusing on kitchen preparation skills, this user-friendly, full-color resource provides practical information on fabricating beef, pork, veal, lamb, game, and exotic meats. Helpful storage information, basic preparation methods for each cut, and recipes are included to give professional and home chefs everything they need to know to produce well-primed cuts of meat. For anyone who believes that butchery is a lost art, The Culinary Institute of America’s Chef Thomas Schneller counters that notion by providing a close examination and explanation of the craft in this clear and concise book.–From Amazon.ca

Streaming Videos

Meat [Video on Demand]
Author: Cordon Bleu

Meat Technology[Video on Demand]
Author: Ontario, Ministry of Agriculture

Braising and Stewing[Videon on Demand]
Author: California Culinary Academy

Need something more specific? Try searching by subject for things like “charcuterie”, in our online catalog. Not only will your search term show up in a title or subject line of a record, but it might also be part of an item’s table of contents. Contact the library for more search tips, help with streaming video or one-one help to support your career path.

 

 

Winter Pick-Me-Ups

January 12, 2017 • Written by

Image credit: CC0 Public Domain image from Pixabay (pixabay.com)

Winter got you down? It’s no wonder with all of the cold, snow and limited sunlight we cope with these days. Below are a few suggestions to help you escape the winter blahs and blues.

Colouring for Stress Relief

Adult colouring has become a popular way to relieve stress. It is calming in the way it causes the brain to focus on the moment, making other thoughts subside. Knitting is another therapeutic task, which has the same quality of  “predictability” that colouring offers. Why not escape the mental tension and try out a few of these colouring pages?

Free Printable Adult Colouring Pages:

Read more: The Therapeutic Science Of Adult Coloring Books: How This Childhood Pastime Helps Adults Relieve Stress

Pursuit of Happiness

Another obvious way to beat the blues is to actively pursue happiness. There are lots of self-help resources out there, but these excellent titles are free for all RRC staff and students to borrow from the Library.

Stumbling on happiness (book)

In this brilliant, witty, and accessible book, renowned Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert describes the foibles of imagination and illusions of foresight that cause each of us to misconceive our tomorrows and misestimate our satisfactions.

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re so smart, why aren’t you happy? (book)

Takes readers on a fun and meaningful tour of the best research available on how some of the very determinants of success may also come to deflate happiness. Raj Raghunathan explores the seven most common inclinations that successful people need to overcome, and the seven habits they should adopt instead.

 

 

 

 

 

Advice from an Expert

Dr. Norman E. Rosenthal is the world-renowned researcher and psychiatrist who first diagnosed Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and light therapy to treat it. His book, Winter Blues: Everything You Need to Know to Beat Seasonal Affective Disorder describes the benefits of light therapy. He offers practical advice, answering just about every question you could think of on the subject. Other ways to help yourself include getting more light, taking a winter vacation, doing exercise, and modifying your diet. Check out this e-book for more information. (RRC network log in required to view).

Build an Igloo!

How to Build an Igloo (video)

This classic short film from the National Film Board shows how to make an igloo using only snow and a knife. Not only is it an activity to get you moving, but it’s also provides a warm place to hang out. (RRC network log in required to view).