Publications

  • Congratulations CAP, IST, BIT on 50th Anniversary!

    January, 2018

    This year the Business Information Technology (BIT) program is celebrating its 50th Anniversary! When the program started in 1968 it was named the Computer Analyst/Programmer program or simply the CAP program as it was widely known. CAP started with tuition fees of $100 for each 5 month term, punch cards, a physical education class and computers that filled an entire room. Years later the program introduced the personal computer, new programming concepts, and a 6 week unpaid practicum.

    In 1999 the Information Systems Technology program was created with more technical courses, where CAP concentrated on business courses. The laptop computer was introduced to both CAP and IST and each student rented one for the duration of the program. The IST program allowed students to specialize in streams such as Programming, Electronic Commerce, and Networking and included a mandatory 6 month co-op, where co-op in CAP was optional.

    Today the CAP and IST programs have combined to make the Business Information Technology program. The two-year program provides business knowledge along with technical courses, complemented by practical applied training through an industry project or paid co-op work term. The program has been accredited for a number of years by the Canadian Information Processing Society (CIPS).

    Throughout the years many students have come and gone. They are Programmers, Analysts, Managers, Developers, Web Developers, and Network Administrators. They are working at Great West Life, MPI, Bold, Online Business Systems, Government among others. They are working throughout the city, and across the world. They have created your websites, your databases, and your network systems. Our graduates have worked their way from being a programmer in a cubicle, to being President of their own company. They have gone from being a student in the classroom to making their own presentations to thousands of people. The students have made this program what it is today and we are incredibly proud to see the contributions to Information Technology each graduate has made. For our 50th Anniversary we want to celebrate the students and staff and say Thank You.

    Throughout this year we will be gathering pictures and stories from alumni and staff. If you have anything to share please email admin@bit50th.ca.

    We will end the celebrations with a big Reunion Dinner for all of our Alumni, Staff and students in November 2018.

  • Chekkit, an ACE Project Space Success Story

    January, 2018
    Chekkit have been 'Entrepreneurs In Residence' here at the ACE Project space since early 2017 and have been working with students from our Applied Computer Education department's Business Information Technology program. Chekkit Wifi Marketing and Analytics is the brainchild of Daniel Fayle, Myles Hiebert, Lee Klimpke and Emily Franz-Lien, whose aim is to help businesses build loyalty programs through Wi-Fi login pages and text messages.
  • The Next Step for Cooperative Education

    November, 2015

    Abstract: At the early stages of startups development they need to change. They must change and adapt to the market. As the young entrepreneurs learn more about their business, their market, and their customers they need to incorporate that knowledge into their business plan. The business plan at that stage of development in the author’s opinion is a dynamic document that keeps evolving until it reaches a state of maturity. And even then there is a level of adaptation takes place based on the changes in the market, technology and other external factors like policies and regulations. On the other hand most of our funding and startups help programs assume all applicants to be at the final state of maturity (there are few programs target the early stages of development) which put young startups at a great disadvantage and they are automatically disqualified in being part of these programs. The author believes that this requirement is just a filtering process to make sure that funds are allocated to mature ideas where there is a higher probability of success. This model is working to a degree, but the question is how many good ideas are disregarded due to the lack of support or the environment to foster them. Many young startups especially in the IT field fail to continue beyond their first year due to the lack of support regardless of the idea. Young entrepreneurs will have to go back to the job search engines to start new career and abandon their ideas no matter how good they are. In this article the author will suggest a model on how post-secondary educational institutes can build that support in their programs and help new entrepreneurs reach the level of maturity to be qualified for other programs. The author will demonstrate that with an experiment conducted by the department of Accounting and Computer Education at Red River College. The author proposes the utilization of the co-op and project terms offered by many programs to help entrepreneurs’ idea cross the gap between the moment of the inception of that idea and the point when they are qualified for other programs.

    Date of Publication: October 2015

    Author: Haider Al-Saidi

    Read Full Text (PDF)

  • The Entrepreneur-In-Residence

    November, 2015

    The idea of Entrepreneur-In-Residence (EIR) is not new, it’s been around for quite some time. It may not be a real position in a firm or educational institute. Matter of fact, there are few variations to the function of this “position” depending on the firm or the institute. Here, I will focus on our implementation which is still in the experimental phase, never the less it produced so far an excellent results. The Accounting and Computer Education (ACE) department at Red River College (RRC) requires that students do an industry project as part of their education. The projects are typically provided by industry partners (usually well established organizations). They are real projects with specific outcomes. The students and faculty work on the projects and deliver the results by the end of the term. This year ACE wanted to open the door to young organizations in their early stages of development. An entrepreneur with a sound idea can qualify to be the Entrepreneur-In-Residence (EIR) who will work directly with faculty and students to further develop the idea and change it to a real product. The investment to create this “position” is just a desk and safe environment where the Students, Faculty, and the EIR can brainstorm to transform the idea into something that is of benefit for everyone. The results were phenomenal, we can judge by the response of the students who took just a bare idea and in a short time transformed it into a product that can be displayed and demonstrated to the world. The interaction between the EIR and students was something of great interest, first this direct interaction taught the students how to be innovators themselves. Second, the EIR demonstrated first hand to the students how to pursue the path of being independent and how exciting to have a dream. There are other accomplishments achieved beside the academic goals that must be achieved as part of the students development in this term.

    The overall experience was wonderful, we can say that in a short period of time with the help of an EIR we created more entrepreneurs with more ideas.

    Date of Publication: October 2015

    Author: Haider Al-Saidi

  • Spirit, Soul, and Dialectical Thinking in Adult Learning

    July, 2015

    Abstract: A discussion about spirit and soul in an adult learning scenario should start examining the definition and purpose of adult learning. The approach to this term involves many learning theories such as: behaviorism, humanism, constructivism, and critical theory. In addition, many types of adult learning like: instrumental, communicative, and emancipatory learning (Nesbit, Brigham, Taber, & Gibb, 2013, pp. 95-100). Per instance, if we just consider UNESCO’s focus: “… educational processes, whatever the content…whereby people regarded as adults by the society to which they belong: develop their abilities, enrich their knowledge…turn them in a new…development” (Spencer & Lange, 2014, p. 8). It will be difficult to find the role of the spirit and the soul in such consideration.

    Date of Publication: July 2015

    Author: Miguel Guzman, Department of Accounting and Computer Education

    Read Full Text (PDF)