Eco-Marathon

College Students Gearing Up for Shell Eco-Marathon

June 30, 2017 • Written by

Bin Yang with a 3D-printed model of the electric car their student-team are building.

Keeping their eyes on the prize, an ambitious team of Red River College students are building an electric car from scratch to compete in the Shell Eco-Marathon competition in the Electric Prototype Division at the 2018 Americas competition taking place on April, 2018, in Detroit, USA.

“We’re all invested in this,” said Mechanical Engineering student Riley McLeod. “It’s something that we’ve made. It’s our creation.” Read More →

Design Constraints: Where to Begin?

November 9, 2016 • Written by

In a previous post, we talked about how Aerodynamics decide the shape of the car body. Since that shape is essential, the other components are system are designed from there.

Shell has specific rules on the car weight, length, width and height. None of the parts can be on the outside of the car, at all.

  1. h) None of the body dimensions above must be achieved by design singularities such as ‘stuck-on’ appendages or cut-outs

(Shell Eco-marathon 2016 Global Rules)

The frame, brakes, electrical, and steering must fit inside the car body (the pod), while allowing space for the driver. Their combined weight must add up to no more than the weight maximum of the rules. This includes a minimum driver weight of 140 kg. Since less weight mean less energy, all teams want their driver very close to that number. It’s another tough challenge, but knowing what percent of the weight the driver will take up allows us to consider the other components weights with respect to it.

The driver also has to be able to see! That’s not so easy to adjust for. Keeping the streamlined shape while adding in the cars various systems makes it a tight fit inside. The driver can’t sit up straight, they must be reclined, conforming to the width and height of the rules.

There’s no door to get in or out. Prototype teams design the pod to split in half along the horizontal. It’s the best method for fabricating and eliminating cracks along the side of the body (which can aversely affect aerodynamics.) 

Here’s a visual of how the driver and components are organized in prototype cars:

École Polytechnique, Montréal

École Polytechnique, Montréal

 

Young Leaders Mentorship Program – Mentors Needed

October 27, 2016 • Written by

CTTAM’s Young Leaders Committee has developed a mentorship program. This program will help facilitate the progression from post-secondary education into the engineering technology industry by mentoring students and new graduates in career development and opportunities available post-graduation.

For more information regarding the mentorship program, please click here. If you are interested in becoming a Mentor for the upcoming term (December 2016 to April 2017), click here for the Mentor application. Please note that the deadline for applications is Wednesday, November 16, 2016.

This is a great opportunity to help CTTAM’s young professionals.

Mentor applicants must meet the following requirements for consideration:
• Must be a certified member in good standing with CTTAM (C.E.T., A.Sc.T., or C.Tech.)
• Must have a minimum of four (4) years of experience in the engineering technology industry
The role and responsibilities of a Mentor includes, but are not limited to:
1. Willingly and openly communicate and provide honest and constructive feedback to their Mentee(s) and to CTTAM Mentorship Program organizers
2. Encourage and guide their Mentee(s) to recognize, develop, and achieve their career goals
3. Advise their Mentee(s) regarding career paths and technical development opportunities within the engineering technology industry.
The success of the Mentorship Program is contingent on active involvement, and we hope that you consider participating.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at YLC@cttam.com.
Regards,
Michael Turko, C.E.T. & Michelle Amigo, C.E.T.
Young Leaders Committee

Electric Prototype Design: It’s All About Aerodynamics!

October 25, 2016 • Written by

The first rule about aerodynamics is it’s a sub-field of fluid dynamics.

And we talk about it; a lot.

In the prototype class aerodynamics are the rule. The entire body of the car is made with the aim to decrease air resistance. We want the air to go right over our driver’s head, down the tail of the car and behind it (where our opponents will be)

The outline of the car body is based on a classic ‘tear-drop’ shape; the most aerodynamic shape for anything slower than the speed of sound. We use that shape to tell the air where to go.

teardrop-2

Telling the air where to go

The air should flow easily around the car. The upper streams should meet the lower streams at the tail to smoothly glide away.

Here’s the first draft of our Team’s car:

bodyfirstdraft-1

The shape is similar to a passenger airplane, or the perimeter shape of an airplane wing; and a bit like a shark without fins (sharks can keep their fins)

coolshark

So Streamy!

That’s the short and fun explanation of why that body shape is chosen. Next post we’ll be sharing more about the Electric Prototype class and its design constraints. Check back soon and often!

Welcome to the Shell Eco-Marathon Team Blog!

October 20, 2016 • Written by
What is the Shell-Eco-marathon?

It’s an annual design competition that pits contestants from schools around the world to fabricate the most energy efficient vehicles possible. Our team will represent your college in the North America’s Division, which takes place in Detroit in 2018

Who are we?

Our team is a group of Mechanical Engineering Technology students who love machines! So we’ve started a blog to share our experience of designing an electric car with you.

We’ll be posting regular updates on our progress, challenges and all of the new things we learn while working on this project.

Check back soon and often to see what we’ve been up to!